History Department

Recently Taught Courses


Courses taught during Fall 2014

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography (3): Zbiek, TT 12:30
The course will provide an understanding of the physical and cultural landscapes lf the earth and the relationships between them.  Topics include geographic tools and techniques; physiogeography and climate; human interaction with the environment; cultural, political and economic systems and structures. and the impact of the land on lives.  This course is required for a Geography Minor and for a Secondary Education Citizenship Education certificate.

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3): Clasby, TT 11
An overview of the basic skills and methods needed for the study of history. Topics will include library and archival research, historical writing, historiography and interpretation, use of the computer and quantitative analysis in history, and the professional opportunities for the history major. Students will complete a supervised research paper that will be considered the Sophomore-Junior Project. This course is normally taken in the first semester of the sophomore year and is required of all History majors. 

HIST 379 Revolutions in Britain and France: 1688-1871 (3): Mares, MWF 11
This course will examine what Eric Hobsbawm labeled the dual revolution--the near simultaneous Industrial Revolution in Great Britain the French Revolution in France. To Hobsbawm, these events combined as the greatest transformation in human history since the remote times when men invented agriculture and metallurgy, writing, the city and the state. We will begin by surveying the histories of the Industrial and French Revolutions. We will spend the second half of the course investigating and questioning the nature of Europe's political, economic, and social transformations after the rapid and shocking developments of the eighteenth century. (Counts for European Elective).

HIST 415 Senior Seminar (3): Mackaman, Tuesday 6-8:30 pm
This capstone course integrates discipline-specific knowledge into a culminating senior experience. Students must analyze and discuss all facets f historical presentations, including scholarly works and public history. Each class member will make an in-depth public presentation demonstrating some aspect of historical research, study, or professional involvement.  This course is normally taken in the first semester of the senior year and is required of all History majors. Prerequisite: HIST 261 Research & Methods.

HIST 459 Seminar: Colonial Worlds (3): Scarboro, MWF 12
Colonialism and its resistance is the subject of this course.  We will investigate the processes (political, military, economic, cultural and ideological) that enabled the western powers to hold sway over much of the world in the modern era and the manner in which colonized people resisted, transformed and found solaces in this domination.  Special attention will be paid to the British and French colonial projects of the 19th and 20th centuries.  (Counts for Seminar requirement and/or European or Non-western/World Elective).

HIST 499 Internship (3)
A one-semester, supervised experience. Past student placements have included federal, state and local government agencies, political staffs, law offices, historical societies, social service organizations, and other local and international businesses.  Registration requires approval of the Office of Experiential Learning.

 

Courses taught during Spring 2014

HIST 230 The Atlantic World (3): Mares, MWF 11
This course examines the history of the exploration of the Atlantic Ocean starting in the fifteenth century and the subsequent colonial systems that European states developed in both South and North America.  We will examine the impetus for the initial Atlantic voyages as well as the incentives for continued Atlantic exploration. We'll explore the impact of the various colonial systems that were established in the "New World,"  and discuss the legacies of the Atlantic colonial systems for both the New World and Europe.  Our goals are to deepen our understanding of early colonial systems, to complicate our conceptualization of the Atlantic World, and to carefully consider the impact of Atlantic exploration and European competition on indigenous populations in the Western Hemisphere. (Counts for American, European or Non-western/World Elective). Link to tentative syllabus.

HIST 258 Pennsylvania Survey (3): Zbiek
An overview of the geography, history, politics, economics, and culture of Pennsylvania.  In addition, contemporary issues within the Commonwealth will be examined.  The course is required for a Citizenship Education Secondary Education certificate.   (Counts for American Elective).

HIST 325 Knights & Castles (3):  Pavlac
The mounted warriors of the Middle Ages and their fortified residences inspire awe, romance, and power even today.  Students will learn how knights became a major element in European warfare; how they lived and fought; how they created a governing class and an elite social rank; how they fashioned an ideology of chivalry in art and literature; and finally, how they declined.    (Counts for European Elective).

HIST 331 American Capitalism (3): Mackaman
This class analyzes the development of American capitalism from Colonial society to the present.  In particular, the course will examine, from the perspective of historical continuity, the interactions of economic development with social and political factors. (Counts for American Elective).

HIST 451 Seminar: History & Memory: Agnes Flood (3):  Clasby
This seminar examines the impact of the Agnes Flood.  This course is one of those which fulfills the seminar course requirement. HIST 420-469, for the history major. (It may also count for an American Elective).

Courses taught during Fall 2013

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography (3): Zbiek
The course will provide an understanding of the physical and cultural landscapes lf the earth and the relationships between them.  Topics include geographic tools and techniques; physiogeography and climate; human interaction with the environment; cultural, political and economic systems and structures. and the impact of the land on lives.  This course is required for a Geography Minor and for a Secondary Education Citizenship Education certificate.

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3): Clasby
An overview of the basic skills and methods needed for the study of history. Topics will include library and archival research, historical writing, historiography and interpretation, use of the computer and quantitative analysis in history, and the professional opportunities for the history major. Students will complete a supervised research paper that will be considered the Sophomore-Junior Project. This course is now taken in the first semester of the sophomore year and is required of all History majors. 

HIST 363 (Re)Inventing Russia (3):  Scarboro 
This course introduces Russian history form the Mongol invasions until the collapse of the Soviet Union viewed through the lenses of empire and debates over the meaning of "Russia."  How did diffeing states seek to invent Russia, rewriting social rules and culture in the process?  What was Russia supposed to look like?  How did subjects domesticate the social order and regulate identities?  (This course counts for Global or European elective).

HIST 415 Senior Seminar (3): Mackaman
This capstone course integrates discipline-specific knowledge into a culminating senior experience. Students must analyze and discuss all facets f historical presentations, including scholarly works and public history. Each class member will make an in-depth public presentation demonstrating some aspect of historical research, study, or professional involvement.  This course is normally taken in the first semester of the senior year and is required of all History majors. Prerequisite: HIST 261 Research & Methods.

HIST 426 Seminar: American Cultures (3):  Zbiek, Thursdays 
This seminar examines how different cultural groupings have originated and interacted through American history.  This course is one of those which fulfills the seminar course requirement. HIST 420-469, for the history major.

Courses taught during Spring 2013

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography (3): Zbiek

HIST 258 Pennsylvania Survey (3): Zbiek,

HIST 273 Jewish History: Medieval to Modern (3):  Clasby
Text.  (Counts for European or Global Elective).
This course traces the history of the Jewish global diaspora since the fall of Rome. The course begins by examining Jewish history, society, and culture under medieval Christian and Muslim rule. While some Jewish communities lived alongside their Christian and Muslim neighbors in relative peace, many others suffered increased prejudice, strict restrictions on their lives, and tremendous violence. By the end of the fifteenth century, Jews had been expelled from most western European countries and lived in precarious conditions in the Mediterranean and Middle East. But starting in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries sweeping changes affected the status and identity of Jews in the global diaspora. The modern period saw the integration and assimilation of Jews into national life, helping them contribute to those societies in new and unique ways. Given that trend, this course also searches for meaning in the narrative of segregation, deportation and murder during the Second World War. The course ends with an examination of the legacy of the Shoah in the emergence of the state of Israel, and in Jewish life in Europe and the Americas. (Counts for European or Non-western/World Elective)

HIST 280 The Colonial World (3): Scarboro
Colonialism and its resistance is the subject of this course.  We will investigate the processes (political, military, economic, cultural and ideological) that enabled the western powers to hold sway over much of the world in the modern era and the manner in which colonized people resisted, transformed and found solaces in this domination.  Special attention will be paid to the British and French colonial projects of the 19th and 20th centuries.  (Counts for European or Non-western/World Elective).

HIST 448 Seminar: Victorian Culture & Customs (3):  Mares
As we in the twenty-first century increasingly hear discussions of morality and cultural values, this course will reflect back, examining a society that might be considered the apotheosis of prudish civilization. This course examines the stereotype of nineteenth-century Britons as morally and sexually repressed individuals. As a class, we will examine how the myth of the Victorians as prudish came about; how generations imagined, crafted, developed, and challenged their ancestors, and the various voices that contributed to those imaginings. We will study how historians have reframed notions of "Victorian" and "prudish" in order to challenge the established stereotypes of the British nineteenth century as stuffy and repressed. Indeed, our ultimate goal is to come to our own understanding of who the Victorians were and what beliefs, attitudes, and institutions guided their lives and how authority and power were wielded in this society to prescribe morality and propriety. Furthermore, we will ask how different our own culture is from that of the Victorians as we, ourselves, face a new era of morality and standards of acceptability. (Counts for European or American Elective and the Seminar requirement).

HIST 482 Murder and Monarchy: Shakespeare's British History:  Pavlac and Lloyd
This course introduces students to the works of Shakespeare through plays he wrote about the history of the British Isles. Team taught from both historical and literary perspectives, students will read plays as both dramatic interpretations of history and enduring works of theatre. Beginning with an examination of the age in which Shakespeare lived and his own life, study will then shift to a chronological review of several plays about British monarchs in the context of actual historical events. The success and failures of his characters use of war, murder, and power will illuminate Shakespeare's efforts as a dramatist, polemicist, and interpreter of the human condition. Students will better understand medieval and renaissance British history and discover Shakespeare's significance within and beyond his age. Counts either for a European History or a English Major Literary Figures course.
Cross-listed as ENGL 382.  Counts both for History Major and English Major Literary Figure course.  Counts for European Elective.

Courses taught during Fall 2012

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography (3): Zbiek

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3): Mares

HIST 381 The Modern Middle East (3): Clasby
This course explores the history of the modern Middle East from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present. In the nineteenth century, this region struggled under Ottoman domination and European colonial exploitation. In the twentieth century, a more independent Middle East emerged. Some states gained sovereignty, while others suffered at the hands of foreign interference. All the while, Middle East states were faced with the demands of modernity and adapted to the contemporary global world in a variety of ways. The course emphasizes three themes: first, the historical evolution of select Middle East states, from dynastic empires in the nineteenth century to modern nation-states in the twentieth; second, the impact of industrialization and westernization on local and regional societies; and third, the socio-cultural dimensions of these large-scale transformations, specifically the rise of mass ideologies of liberation and development. (Counts for World Elective).

HIST 415 Senior Seminar (3): Scarboro

HIST 436 Seminar: Deindustrialization in America  (3): Mackaman
Deindustrialization in America: In this course students will learn about the causes and the consequences of the decline of the American industrial order after WWII. Why did the US economy go from being the world's industrial colossus to one largely based on finance? What has the decline of industry meant for the cities and industrial regions of the "Rust Belt"? What have these processes meant for the social, political, and cultural physiognomy of the country and more broadly, for America's place in the world?  (Counts for American Elective).

Courses taught during Spring 2012

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography (3): Zbiek

HIST 255 America in the 20th Century  (3): Mackaman
In this course students will learn about the major changes in US history from WWI. This period encompasses the rise of the US as the preeminent global power as a result of the world wars and its enormous industrial capacity, and then its relative economic decline from the 1970s onward. It encompasses the rise of liberal reformism out of the Great Depression and what has been called the "New Deal order," and this order's waning beginning with the crises of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Close attention will be paid to the lives and struggles of ordinary people, including industrial workers, African Americans, immigrants, and women. With the 20th century heralding the full emergence of the mass consumer market, we will also view the century's history through the prism of popular culture, including cinema and music.  (Counts for American Elective).

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3): Mares
This course is normally taken in the first semester of the sophomore year and is required of all History majors. 

HIST 374 Greece and Rome: 500 B.C. - A.D. 500 (3): Pavlac
War, slaughter, order, peace.  This course will examine empire building, empire-maintaining and empire-collapsing in the cultures of Classical Greece and Rome.  The rise of empire will cover the Delian League, the Macedonia success of Alexander the Great, Rome's expansion through the Punic Wars, and so many more.  The maintenance of empire will review issues of commerce, justice, citizenship, taxation, and cultural conflict.  The fall of empires will include the the Peloponnesian Wars, and the crises and collapse of the Western half of the Roman Empire.  Readings will be drawn from the historians and humanists of antiquity. (Counts as European Elective).
Link to 2006 syllabus.

HIST 426 Seminar: American Cultures (3):  Zbiek 
This seminar examines how different cultural groupings have originated and interacted through American history.  This course is one of those which fulfills the seminar course requirement. HIST 420-469, for the history major.

HIST 471 Global Fascism (3): Clasby
Fascist regimes dominated the global landscape of the first half of the twentieth century. In many ways, the second half of the twentieth century struggled to resolve the crises those regimes left behind after their defeat in the Second World War. This class will examine this history of fascism in a global context. We will explore fascism's origins in Europe and the development and institutionalization of it as both a movement and regime. We will also question whether fascism truly disappeared in 1945, or if, perhaps, fascism or fascist-style ideologies, movements, and regimes lived on. The class will focus mainly on Italy, Germany, and Japan as case studies, but we will also examine fascist-style movements and systems of rule in countries like Spain and France, and in non-European places as diverse as Argentina, China, Iraq, and even the United States. We will look at both primary documents, crafted by those who dreamed up the idea and concept of fascism and by those who practiced it, and a wealth of secondary literature written by modern historians. Bringing these different sources together, we will place everything we think we know about fascism on the table, creating definitions, points of reference and discussion and conclusions about fascism's nature, its history and its legacy. (Counts for World Elective).

Courses taught during Fall 2011

HIST 258 Pennsylvania Survey (3): Zbiek

HIST 338 The American Civil War  (3): Mackaman
This course examines the roots of the Civil War (1861-1865) in the sectional crisis between North and South over slavery, and the war's impact on society, politics, culture, and everyday life.  (Counts for American Elective).

HIST 415 Senior Seminar (3): Mares, Zbiek

HIST 444 Seminar: The Witch Hunts (3): Pavlac
From the fifteenth to the eighteenth the centuries, many Europeans developed a heightened concern with the phenomenon of witchcraft, seeing a new sect hostile to humanity.  The end of the Middle Ages and the religious Reformation increased the intensity of the "Witch Craze."  Finally, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment brought an end to the hunt for powers that did not empirically exist.  Through reading and discussion of primary and secondary sources, you will learn how these Europeans defined and treated their alleged witches, within the context of other economic, social, and cultural relationships. Included in this study will be the examination of new technologies and methods of rule in the rise of the modern state, and the roles of class and gender in focusing hostility on certain people, especially women. (Counts for European Elective, as a Seminar, and for Women's Studies) Link to a syllabus.

HIST 472 Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Mediterranean World (3): Clasby
This course examines the ethnic and religious cultures of the Mediterranean world, from the medieval period to the present day. The course demonstrates how cross-cultural contact among Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Mediterranean led to a world in which religious tolerance co-existed with violence and ethno-religious conflict. The course highlights the numerous interconnectivities of Mediterranean world communities in Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East with an eye toward religious and cultural beliefs, economics and trade, political events and warfare, language and the arts, and intellectual and scientific issues. We will also consider the Mediterranean itself as an important character in the narrative of history and think about the ways in which ecology and geography can have an impact on history. The latter part of the course is designed to investigate the creation, transformation and enforcement of the boundaries of Mediterranean identity through two case studies: the ghettoized Jews of early modern Venice and marginalized Muslim Turks in contemporary Europe. (Counts for World Elective).

Courses taught during Spring 2011

HIST 258 Pennsylvania Survey (3): Zbiek

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography (3): Zbiek

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3): Pavlac  Link to a syllabus.

HIST 379 Revolutions in Britain and France: 1688-1871 (3): Mares
This course will examine what Eric Hobsbawm labeled the dual revolution--the near simultaneous Industrial Revolution in Great Britain the French Revolution in France. To Hobsbawm, these events combined as the greatest transformation in human history since the remote times when men invented agriculture and metallurgy, writing, the city and the state. We will begin by surveying the histories of the Industrial and French Revolutions. We will spend the second half of the course investigating and questioning the nature of Europe's political, economic, and social transformations after the rapid and shocking developments of the eighteenth century. (Counts for European Elective).

HIST 368 Cold War Cultures (3): Scarboro
This course explores the cold war as a global phenomenon.  Special attention will be paid to the predicament of post war Europe which emerged from the rubble of the war with its old institutions discredited, economies shattered and found itself caught between the competing interests of two new superpowers.  We will trace the Cold Wars development through movies, architecture, visual art and novels and through competing visions of the good life manifested in consumer culture and leisure: vacations, housing, washing machines, automobiles and televisions. (Counts as European or American Elective).

HIST 377 German Europe: 1815-1945 (3): Pavlac
This course presents a survey of the political and cultural development of Europe from the fall of Napoleon to the fall of Hitler, focusing on the roles played by the German peoples whose descendants now live in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. At the core of this period is "The German Problem:" namely, what political structures should govern the German peoples and their neighbors in the center of the European Continent? Themes include problems of unification and division, social adjustments to constitutional democracy and the rise of Fascism, rule over different ethnic groups and racism, social commentary in the arts and literature, economic and military competition between neighboring European powers, and the German attempt to dominate the European continent in World War I and World War II. (Counts for European Elective).

HIST/WMST 460 Seminar: Japan, Cultures of Daily Life (3): Postma
What are the categories of Daily Life? The current course takes up food, manners of dress, and other aspects of the everyday as an exploration of a deeper history of life on the Japanese archipelago. The course draws upon a wide literature to assess the larger problems of the family, male-female politics, gender, poverty, infanticide, fascism, crime and the underworld, as well as prostitution in Japan. We will cover early archaelogy, delving into the classical and medieval roots of the Japanese warrior, geisha, or the Japanese imperial family, while also exploring local, American ties. The seminar is an introductory course, providing the student an opportunity to explore histories of the modern Japanese condition while envisioning how the Japanese survived from day to day, using what implements, in what environments, as seen from different perspectives.   (Counts for Non-western/World Elective, as a Seminar and for Women's Studies).

Courses taught during Fall 2010

HIST 250 American Political History (3):  Fedrick
A survey of the historical development of the American political system from the Federalist Era to the current day. The course will examine growth of the major American political parties as well as third party movements. Primary focus will include political party philosophies and programs, ideas and forces which shaped the political system, men and women who served as party leaders, and significant state and national elections. (Crosslisted as PS 260. Counts for American Elective).

HIST 378 Women and Gender in European History since the Enlightenment (3): Mares
This course explores the role of women and gender in Modern European history. Key historical topics discussed in class include the French Revolution, Victorian Britain, post-WWI France, Fascism, and second-wave feminism. The course also examines how historians understand and use gender as a category of historical analysis in their work. Students will read works from key historians in the field of womens and gender history as well as analyze key historical constructs such as femininity, maternity, masculinity, and family. (Counts for European Elective).

HIST 470 Wanderers and Warriors (3): Postma
How did medieval and pre-modern peoples in East Asia grapple with uncertain environments? This course will explore periods of civil war, chaos, and disruption across Japan, China, and Korea, looking both at how the military elites responded, and what ordinary people did, including the wives and children left behind. Sources include texts on martial codes of honor, Buddhist and Confucian origins, warrior bands, histories and medieval chronicles and romances, as well as cultural and popular representations in books and film.  (Counts for Non-western/World Elective).

HIST 380 The Colonial World (3): Scarboro

CARP 412, section I (1)
The purposes of this course are to assist you in clarifying your career objectives and to help you become adept at the job search process. You will be involved in career testing and job exploration exercises which will assist you in assessing your personality traits, your abilities and interests, determining your direction and focusing your energies on your placement after college. You will develop an effective resume, engage in writing various forms of written correspondence to be sent to employers and learn how to effectively use the Internet and other resources to identify and explore potential employers. Insights into the process of interviewing will be presented, with an emphasis on executive presence, the process of handling difficult interview questions, and suggestions on taking the interview to the next stage of the job search. You will be instructed on how to organize an effective job search, use networking to your advantage, and the essentials of attending a job fair. You will also become familiar with graduate and professional school application procedures. The course is only open to juniors and seniors in the History department. This section has been a collaborative effort between the History Department and the Career Planning Office to meet the unique needs of a History majors transition into his/her professional career.

HIST 415 Senior Seminar (3): Scarboro, Zbiek

Courses taught during Summer 2010

HIST 372 Modern Britain: Mares

HIST 487 Nationalism and the Balkans: Scarboro

HIST 489 Chasing the Eastern Horizon: Scarboro, Costello
Short-term, Faculty-led, Study Abroad Program to Bulgaria and Turkey

Courses taught during Spring 2010

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography (3): Zbiek

HIST 230 The Atlantic World (3): Mares

HIST 258 Pennsylvania Survey (3):  Zbiek

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3): Pavlac

HIST 350 Christianities (3): Pavlac, Malesic
The history of Christianity is a rich, complex story, full of tragedy and triumph.  The course focuses most on Christianity as a Western phenomenon, but also examines its becoming world-wide belief systems.  Study focuses on the conflicts that have shaped the ecclesiology, theology, and practice of Christians, placing them in their political, social, and cultural context.  The participant should gain a better awareness of the role of controversy and compromise in Christian history, as well as a deeper understanding of many significant beliefs, people, events, and trends. Cross-Listed as THEO 351 History of Christian Thought. (Counts for European Elective.  Link to tentative syllabus.

HIST 384 East Asian Cultural History (3): Postma
Taking five moments from histories of culture across Japan, China, and Korea, this course depicts the social movements, political resistance to authority, response to external challenge, and the resulting impact upon family and social relations in East Asia. The course begins with the arrival of American ships into Japan of the mid-19th century, to present writings in translation, novels, short stories, woodblock prints, songs, and contemporaneous films that depict first traditional, and then feminist and other critical social thought in up to 1940. Cross-Listed as Women's Studies. (Counts for Non-western/World Elective)

HIST 440 Seminar: Geographies of Europe (3): Scarboro
Outside the conveniences of maps and ideas of tectonic plates, Europe has never been a fixed space; rather it has always resided within flexible and permeable boundaries of convention. Who belongs to Europe, who is excluded, and the consequences of this demarcation have changed dramatically over time. This course investigates the creation, transformation, and enforcement of these boundaries of Europe. Area Studies. Although designed as a stand-alone class, this course may also be used as the first part of the Geographies of Europe sequence: the second half will be a three-week Kings College Study Abroad program,Geographies of Europe: Sofia-Istanbul during the summer of 2010.  (Counts for European Elective). Listed as an Honors Course.  Cross-listed as SOC 491.

HIST 387 World War II: Stevens
A multidimensional survey of the Second World War.  The course will examine the major stratgic choices which confronted the Axis and Allies 1939-1945 and the campaigns that followed;  the unique Anglo-American alliance; relations with Soviet Russia and China; and the major wartime conferences.  Topics of special interest will include American war mobilization, economic warfare; the role of women on the home front, the film and propaganda war, the strategic bombing controversy, and the atomic bomb decision.  (Counts for American, European, or Non-Western Elective).

HIST 499 Internship (3)

CARP 412 section I

Courses taught during Fall 2009

HIST 252 Asian Civilizations (3):  Postma
A survey of the major civilizations of monsoon Asia, ranging from the Indian Subcontinent through Indochina and Indonesia to China and Japan.  focus will be on the key political, social, and cultural developments of the major peoples from their beginnings to the present.  Of special interest will be how they influenced each other and how they interacted with Western Civilization in the modern period.  The course is required for all Citizenship Education Secondary Education students.   (Counts for World Elective).

HIST 337 The United States: Revolution to Republic 1763-1815 (3): Fedrick
Analysis of the American revolution and the establishment of the American Republic. Special attention and emphasis will be given to the influence of Anglo-American ideas and institutions, the British imperial policies and colonial reaction, Revolutionary ideology, the social and political consequences of the Revolution. Also treated will be government in the Confederation period as well as the establishment of the Constitution, the ideological conflicts and factionalism in the Washington, Adams, Jefferson administrations including foreign policy and the impact of the Anglo-French conflict in the period.  (Counts for American Elective).  Link to syllabus.

HIST 381 The Modern Middle East (3):  Curran

HIST 470 Special Topics: Victorian Culture & Customs (3):  Mares

HIST 479 Knights & Castles (3):  Pavlac

Courses taught during Spring 2009

HIST 258 Pennsylvania Survey (3):  Zbiek

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3):  Pavlac

HIST 339  The United States since 1945: Fedrick
Simply stated, it is the study of how men and women created the United States of America in the second half of the 20th Century - the American Century.
We will examine the pursuit of peace around the world in which the United States secured for itself an unparalleled position in the world at the bargaining table and on the battlefront including armed conflict in Korea, in Vietnam, in the Middle East, and in several other areas of the globe and developed the world's largest military-industrial-scientific complex.
"Guns and Butter?" was and is often the underlying question of the economic debates of this period which were framed in such terms as the Fair Deal, the Great Society, Reaganomics, and the Contract With America. Since 1945 the U.S. has witnessed phenomenal national and international growth of American business and corporate entities as well the increase of the middle class and those below the poverty line.
Our study will attempt to probe those major economic issues as well as the Civil Rights movement which challenged the age-old shibboleths of "separate but equal". We will listen to the voices of feminists, gays and lesbians, young people, and many new immigrants who required reexamination of long accepted standards of exclusion. Presidential assassination, impeachment, and resignation offer significant opportunities to examine the character of political leadership since 1945.
Study of the U.S. Since 1945 compels study of the powerful impact of the communication and information revolution and how television and Hollywood have altered our playtime. Art, music, entertainment, sport, and recreation provide additional and unique cultural history focal points.
(Counts for American Elective).

HIST 365 Latin America (3): Scarboro
This class centers on Latin American interaction with and transformation of notions of modernity. The conquest of the hemisphere by European empires in the 15th century unleashed a cascade of revolutions in the economic, cultural and political worlds and worldviews of both colonizers and colonized. In this class we will investigate how these transformations resolved themselves in colonialism and its resistance; the growth of nationalism; negotiations about the good society in the newly emerging nation-states of Latin America; the creation and costs of economic modernization; and the regions role in the Cold War. (Counts for Non-Western and Area Studies).

HIST 387 World War II: Stevens

CARP 412 section I:  M 10

Courses taught during Fall 2008

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography:  Zbiek

HIST 260 American Political History (3):  Fedrick

HIST 363 Russia in Historical Perspective (3):  Curran
A study of the crucial developments and highlights in the evolution of the Russian state from the Kievan period to the present. Emphasis will be on the roles of ideology, geography, environment and history in forming, shaping and maintaining authoritarian government. The study of the contemporary period, especially that dealing with the creation, establishment and disintegration of the Soviet state, will receive intensive examination. (Counts for European or Non-western/World Elective).

HIST 371 International Politics (3):  Stevens
Selected aspects of international politics at three major levels of analysis; the international political system; the major actors in the system; the principal forms of interaction between actors in the system. Among topics are the balance of power; collective security; foreign policy decision-making; environmental factors; diplomacy, bargaining and war; arms control; role of non-national actors like the multinational corporation and the United Nations. Case study illustrations will be utilized. (Cross-listed as PS 371 and IB 371. Counts for Non-western/World Elective).

HIST 380 The Colonial World (3): Scarboro

HIST 415 Senior Seminar:  Fedrick

HIST 444 The Witch Hunts: Pavlac

Courses taught during Spring 2008

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography:  Zbiek,

HIST 258 Pennsylvania Survey (3):  Zbiek

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3):  Scarboro

HIST 343 The American Presidency: Fedrick
In this course we will attempt an analysis of the significant developments in the evolution of the Presidency using a study of the administrations of a select group of American Presidents. Emphasis will be on an examination of the leadership roles each exercised in shaping the character of the office as well as a focus on the primary political, economic, and cultural forces of the respective historical periods. Washington, Jefferson, Jackson, Lincoln and the major twentieth century Presidents will be the primary subjects of the course; however, they will not be the only subjects of our study. (Counts as American Elective). Link to syllabus.

HIST 383 China (3):  Curran
A survey of the unique characteristics of civilization and institutions of China as they evolved, and their relevance in the contemporary era. Internal patterns influencing China's response to Western impact as well as the collapse of traditional China through the Nationalist phase to Communism will be considered. Mao Zedong and contemporary China will be analyzed. (Counts as Non-Western/World Elective).

HIST 488 Eastern Europe: Scarboro
A survey of how Eastern European nations have been created and defined in interaction with Western Civilization, empire building, and world wars.  (Counts as Western Elective).

Courses taught during Fall 2007

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography:  Zbiek

HIST 339  The United States since 1945: Fedrick

HIST 358 American Cultural Geography (3):  Zbiek
A topical examination of the relationship between geography and cultural development in the United States. Topics to be studied include folk, popular and vernacular cultures; settlement patterns; regionalism; linguistics; race and ethnicity; religion; socioeconomic status; and forces of unity and diversity. The students will also become familiar with the methods and process of geographic study. (Counts as American Elective)

HIST 381 The Modern Middle East (3):  Curran

HIST 385 Japan: Stevens
A survey of the unique characteristics of civilization and institutions of Japan as they evolved, and their relevance in the contemporary era. Westernization, the first non-Western model of parliamentary development, and the rise of Japan to world power will be analyzed. The impact of the occupation, and the socio-political problems of a hybrid culture and industrial giant will be considered.  (Counts as Non-Western/World Elective).

HIST 415 Senior Seminar:  Fedrick

HIST 477 Cold War Cultures: Scarboro

Courses taught during Spring 2007

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography:  Zbiek

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3):  Pavlac

HIST 303 History of America's Major Wars:  Curran
This course is a systematic examination of the major wars engaged in by the United States, analyzing how and why we entered, what we accomplished, and what were the consequences of our involvement.  The Vietnam conflict will receive intensive scrutiny and emphasis, particularly the decision-making process.  (Counts for American).

HIST 360 American Public Rhetoric: Fedrick
The course will examine the "visions and voices" of women and men in American history. While the spoken word sermon, speech, oration, eulogy, - will be the principal focus of the study, selected printed prose and poetry where appropriate will be included in the course as well. Focus will be given to significant periods of American history and the major political, social, and cultural crosscurrents of those periods. Students will study the structures and substance of major selections of American rhetoric as well as examine the historical context of these selections. Selections will be used as appropriate in whole or abbreviated format. Students will use PRIMARY SOURCES as the exclusive materials of study in the course and, where possible, appropriate audio and/or visual records will be used to assist in the study.  (Counts for American).

HIST 387 World War II: Stevens

HIST 477 Murder and Monarchy: Shakespeare's British History:  Pavlac and Lloyd

Courses taught during Fall 2006

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography:  Zbiek

GEOG 252 World Cultural and Economic Geography:  Zbiek
A basic survey of the physical and human geography on worldwide scope. Topics include geographic concepts; the physical geography and climate; the human interaction with the environment; and the nature and development of culture.  This course is required for all Elementary Education majors.  It does not count toward the History Major.  

HIST 255 History through Selected Biography (3):  Scarboro

HIST 260 American Political History (3):  Fedrick

HIST 363 Russia in Historical Perspective (3):  Curran

HIST 371 International Politics (3):  Stevens

HIST 415 Senior Seminar (3):  Fedrick

Courses taught during Spring 2006

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography:  Zbiek 

GEOG 252 World Cultural and Economic Geography:  Zbiek

HIST 258 Pennsylvania Survey (3):  Zbiek

HIST 261 Research & Methods (3):  Pavlac

HIST 337 The United States: Revolution to Republic 1763-1815 (3): Fedrick

HIST 374 Greece and Rome: 500 B.C. - A.D. 500 (3): Pavlac  Link to syllabus.

HIST 381 The Modern Middle East (3):  Curran

HIST 425 Social and Historical Analysis: Women in Sport:  Ish
From a historical perspective I would like to connect the emergence of women playing sport and what attitudes and societal norms during the different time periods. I have a special interest in how changing role of higher education played a role in the growth of women's athletics starting with the establishment of women's colleges.    (Counts as American Elective).

Courses taught during Fall 2005

HIST/GEOG 211 Introduction to Geography:  Zbiek 

HIST/GEOG 252 World Cultural and Economic Geography:  Zbiek

HIST 265 American Social History: Fry
A topical examination of the development of American attitudes and institutions. This is the history of the common people and the topics include the frontier, religion and ethnicity, racism and slavery, agriculture and urbanization.

HIST 331 American Business and Labor in Historical Perspective: Curran
An analysis of the development of American business from Colonial society to the present. In particular, the course will examine, from the perspective of historical continuity, the interaction of economic development with social and political factors.

HIST 373 Women in Western Civilization: Pavlac
Daughters and dowagers, moms and mistresses, queens and queers, witches and workers, bundled with sex and science. Women and their past achievements are often largely absent from the history books, although they have accounted for about half of the human race. This course surveys the historical and cultural roles of women from the beginnings of humanity through classical, medieval, and early modern European history up to the beginning of the 20th Century. As we analyze both representative individuals and general trends, topics will include theories of womens history, legal rights and their influence on political participations, economic contributions, gender roles in family and community institutions, cultural constructions, and religious vocations.  Syllabus.

HIST 385 Japan: Stevens

HIST 415 Senior Seminar:  Fedrick

Courses taught during Spring 2005

HIST/GEOG 252 World Cultural and Economic Geography:  Zbiek

HIST 258 Pennsylvania Survey (3):  Zbiek

HIST 261 Research and Methodology (3):  Pavlac

HIST 303 History of America's Major Wars:  Curran

HIST 339  The United States since 1945: Fedrick

HIST 425 World War II: Stevens

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