HIST/WMST 373
Women in Western Civilization

Syllabus Fall 2005 

Prof. Pavlac
U.S. Mail Address:
History Department
King's College
131 North River Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

e-mail: bapavlacATkings.edu
Tel: (570) 208-5900, ext. # 5748
Fax: (570) 208-5988 
Office: Hafey-Marian 307
Office Hours:  by appointment

Final Exam Questions | Written Assignments | Class Schedule

Grading Policy | Academic Honesty Policy | Women's History Site

I. Description

Daughters and dowagers, moms and mistresses, queens and queers, witches and workers, bundled with sex and science. Women and their past achievements are often largely absent from the history books, although they have accounted for about half of the human race. This course surveys the historical and cultural roles of women from the beginnings of humanity through classical, medieval, and early modern European history up to the beginning of the 20th Century. As we analyze both representative individuals and general trends, topics will include theories of women’s history, legal rights and their influence on political participations, economic contributions, gender roles in family and community institutions, cultural constructions, and religious vocations. 


II. Purpose

This is a History European Sequence course, suitable for majors and non-majors.  It is also a Women's Studies course.  

Objectives for the student:

  1. To identify major events, persons and ideas which contributed to the development of European, Western and world attitudes or institutions.
  2. To develop concepts and methods which give meaning and order to the primary material of our recorded past.
  3. To read primary and secondary sources and explain their significance to relevant historical problems.
  4. To practice critical and analytical skills on historical controversies.
  5. To identify and analyze significant problems and situations as they relate to the continuing issues of historical investigation.
  6. To recognize the inclusionary and exclusionary distinctions of our cultural heritage, based on gender, class, creed or other conditions
  7. To demonstrate familiarity with scholarly study about women, gender and culture.
  8. To understand feminist views and theories as points of both intellectual departure and critical inquiry.

Goals for the student:

  1. To develop a wider perspective which recognizes the political, economic and cultural interdependence of differing societies and people, and which encourages a more inclusive view of the human experience.
  2. To heighten awareness of the specific contributions and perspectives of diverse members of society.
  3. To engender an appreciation of different ways of knowing and living, and to affirm individual experience as a legitimate foundation of knowledge.
  4. To act upon the values formed during the study of complex interrelations between gender and social life
  5. To understand the influence of the past on contemporary events and problems, or, in other words, to develop "Historical Mindedness."

General Learning Outcomes for the student:

In addition to the more content related objectives described above, this course has some general liberal learning goals. Successful completion of this course is expected to help improve your ability

  1. To manage information, which involves sorting data, ranking data for significance, synthesizing facts, concepts and principles.
  2. To understand and use organizing principles or key concepts against which miscellaneous data can be evaluated.
  3. To differentiate between facts, opinions and inferences.
  4. To frame questions in order to more clearly clarify a problem, topic or issue.
  5. To compare and contrast the relative merits of opposing arguments and interpretations, moving between the main points of each position.
  6. To organize your thoughts and communicate them clearly and concisely in a written form and oral presentations.
  7. To obtain practice in selecting and presenting information and arguments within a restricted environment, especially the limitations of time in exams.
  8. To become familiar with the use and creation of internet research tools.

III. General Requirements

1. Readings:

Bridenthal, Mosher Stuard, and Wiesner, Becoming Visible: Women in European History.

DiCaprio and Wiesner, Lives and Voices: Sources in European Women's History.  

The required readings are intended both to provide you with important factual and background information before class and to be used as review and reference works afterwards. Before class, you will read the chapters or pages assigned according to the class schedule. Not all topics in the books will be covered in class, but you are responsible for them on the exam and in class discussion. Each class the instructor may select at random one student to present the day's reading and show how it integrates with the other material (Each presentation worth 10 points).

You should make notes in the margins or a notebook, underline key statements, highlight important passages, and/or annotate essential details in order to be better prepared for classroom discussion.

If necessary, the instructor may give quizzes to test your reading and comprehension of the texts, or evaluate your copy of the text for a quiz grade on your preparation.


2. Class Participation & Attendance:

Participation and attendance are necessary because lecture and discussion provide the essentials for achieving class goals and objectives. Thus a portion of your grade (about 20%) will depend on your in-class performance. You are required to attend each class, arrive on time, remain attentive, respond to questions, ask questions and participate in any in-class projects. You may also need to prepare questions and lead class discussion.

Especially in your readings book, you must make notes in the margins or a notebook, underline key statements, highlight important passages, and/or annotate essential details in order to be better prepared for classroom discussion.

Lectures may be recorded with the instructor's permission, although the tapes must be erased after the exams.

The instructor will regularly take attendance. Absences due to college activities, emergency or extended illness may be excused by the appropriate director or dean. Other absences are unexcused and will lower the class participation portion of your grade. After any absence, you are responsible for making up missed work, requesting hand-outs and already returned assignments, or borrowing notes from other students. Whether absences are excused or not, you cannot get a higher grade than the percentage of classes attended.

All students who have a learning disability, physical handicap and/or any other possible impediment to class participation and requirements should schedule an appointment with the instructor during the first week of class to discuss available accommodations.

If you miss an exam, contact the instructor as soon as possible. You may take a missed exam only at the discretion of the instructor. The makeup exam may be in the form of an oral exam.

If at some point during the semester you must discontinue the course, due to poor performance, illness or some other cause, be sure to follow proper procedures for withdrawal.


3. Other Requirements

You will take one mid-term exam on the assigned date in the class schedule, section VII, and a final exam as assigned during finals week. Exams are described in more detail below, section V.

You will have several discussion on source readings intermittently through the semester. You also may be evaluated by short quizzes or written reports done in-class or after class, either individually or in groups, worth between 10 and 20 points each.

Always you are required read before class the appropriate material (as listed on the class schedule, section VII, or otherwise assigned by the instructor) and be prepared to discuss and/or write about it with the instructor or in small groups. Each class the instructor may select at random one student to present the day's reading and show how it integrates with the other material (Each presentation worth 10 points).

Several times the instructor will also check your books for that class's text readings and evaluate the quality of your note taking or highlighting (10 points each time).

Short quizzes or written reports may also be required to evaluate the comprehension of video presentations. Students with unexcused absences will receive no credit for the videos/project/discussion. Students with excused absences may prepare a short report, after consultation with the instructor.

You will have regular in-class writing assignments.  These will consist of short quizzes and short writing exercises dealing with the text or other class material.

4. Deadlines:

Meeting due dates are an important aspect of written assignments.  Papers should be handed in, in person, at the beginning of class on the dates assigned and listed on the class schedule (on your printed syllabus). 

The grade of any assignment you turn in late will lose at least 10% after the beginning of the first class, 20% after the second, and 35% after the third. 

No late papers will be accepted after the last day of class. 


IV. Grades:

You earn your grade through work done for this course.

For more information see grading policy.

For your protection, in case of errors in recording, you should keep copies of all exams and assignments until you have received notice of your grade.

Your final grade will be based on a percentage (above 91%=A, 89%=B+, 81%=B, etc.) of the sum of the following points:


V. Exams:

A. General Description:

You will take one mid-term exam on the assigned date in the class schedule, and a final exam as assigned during finals week.

Both exams will consist of short identifications quizzing knowledge of detail and significance, and essays testing your understanding of the course material through logical presentation of facts and explanation of historical trends.

To study for the exams you should regularly, at least once a week, review your class notes, especially for identifications drawn from the overhead outline. You should also compare and contrast these notes with your textbook and other readings.

Only paper from the instructor is to be used. Please write legibly, in ink. Also note the academic honesty policy.


B. Sample Final Exam:

-Write your name only on the first page.

Under Construction: II. Short Essay (20%, 20 pts.; 15 min.): for the following, on the provided lined paper, write a clear, legible essay, being sure to plan your answer and being sure to use specific details.

III. Long Essay (50%, 50 pts.; 40 min.): for the following, on the provided lined paper, write a clear, legible essay, being sure to plan your answer and being sure to use specific details.


VI.  Written Assignments:

A. Format:

Both for practice in following guidelines and to facilitate consistency in grading, papers should be uniform in appearance.  Every assignment you turn in should have a cover page with your name, but your name should not appear on subsequent pages.  Staple papers in the upper left-hand corner;  do not use any binders, folders or paper clips.  Note any guidelines that vary with a specific assignment in the relevant section. 

For more information, see <http://departments.kings.edu/history/presentation.html>.  

       These papers are to be typed or word processed, grammatically polished, written in a formal style with no contractions or slang, references presented in Turabian format (See Corgan Library Study Guide #11), and should show evidence of usage of the text and library research. 

B. Plagiarism:

Plagiarism on written assignments is a serious breach of expected academic honesty. For more information see, http://departments.kings.edu/history/honesty.html

C.  Woman’s Biography and Bibliography: 

You will write a biography of a selected woman from history, with an annotated bibliography.                        

Purpose:

Historians are both explainers and researchers.  One increasing location of research is the World Wide Web, which is composed of what people decide to post to the internet.  In order to create a location of valuable information about history, you will help to build on our Women’s History Resource Site.  You will also learn to manage information, evaluate different historical opinions, analyze arguments, organize your thoughts and present them in a clear written form.

Procedure:

1. Select one woman or history topic from the list provided by the instructor from a list on his office door (Hafey-Marian 307) by September 21.  You may choose another person or topic only explicit written approval of the instructor).  Only one person per topic;  first come, first served.  Failure to choose a topic by October 5th will result in a 0 (ZERO) for the assignment. 

2.  Carefully research the topic/person. 

3.  Write an entertaining and informative biography or description of the topic/person (500-750 words).  Be sure to review and revise.

4.  Compile a thorough annotated bibliography (see library study guide #14).  For a C grade, you must annotate at 4 (FOUR) secondary books (not counting the text), 1 (ONE) professional journal article and 3 (THREE) internet locations.   Be sure to review and revise.

5.  Provide web-ready copy (html) on a floppy disc, incorporating the instructor’s corrections and comments, of the biography, annotations and links, due at the latest December.

 

D. Women’s History Site Revision:

You will review and correct information on the Women’s History Site.  

Purpose:
As above, an increasing location of research is the World Wide Web, which is composed of what people decide to post to the internet.  Information can also be outdated or incorrect.  In order to maintain quality valuable information about history, you will help revise our Women’s History Resource Site.  In general this will mean offering and encoding suggestions for improvement of the current site.

Procedure:

1. Select three women and/or topics that are currently on the site (sign up on the list on the instructor’s office door (Hafey-Marian 307).  Only one person per woman/topic;  first come, first served.  

2.  Review the biography and annotated bibliography for mistakes, errors, dead links, and any other areas of revision. 

3.  Provide a printed copy showing the suggested changes and a web-ready copy on floppy disk. 

E. Assessment:
The instructor will grade your written assignments based on his evaluation of how well you follow the instructions as to content and presentation.

For more information on the grading of your papers see Assessment.


VII. Class Schedule:

All topics and assignments on the schedule are tentative; the instructor may change them at his discretion.  Please see the printed syllabus for more details.  Women's History Hypertext

date topic readings other
assignments
Aug 30 Orientation none none
Sep  Intro to Women's History    
Sep  Pre-History    
Sep  Ancient Middle East    
Sep  Ancient Greece    
Sep  Ancient Rome    
Sep  Christianity    
Sep  Early Medieval    
Oct  Women Ideas    
Oct  Late Medieval    
Oct  Pre-Industrial Economy    
Oct  Renaissance    
Oct  Early Modern Marriage    
Oct  Early Modern Work    
Oct  Reformation    
Nov Witch Hunts    
Nov  Women's Rule    
Nov  Enlightenment    
Nov  French Revolution    
Nov  Industrial Revolution    
Nov  19th-Century Ideologies    
Nov  19th-century reforms    
Nov  19-century class    
Dec  Socialism    
Dec  Suffrage    

 Women's History Hypertext http://www.ic.arizona.edu/ic/mcbride/ws200/ws200ds.htm

People with a History <http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/pwh/index-anc.html>


Final Exam Questions | Written Assignments | Class Schedule

Grading Policy | Academic Honesty Policy | Women's History Site



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Last Revision: 31 August 2005
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