CORE 132A – THE 20TH CENTURY:  GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES

FALL 2004  -- MWF 9:00AM – 9:50AM

SANDRA MIHOCH KASE 

Instructor of History

King’s College

Wilkes-Barre, PA  18711

 

COURSE SYLLABUS

 

THE CORE CURRICULUM: CIVILIZATION SEQUENCE

Civilization courses are designed to explore in some depth the complex dimensions of the human experience. These courses study the cumulative experiences of the past to assist in understanding our complex world and assist in the responsible shaping of the future of that world. 


CIVILIZATION: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES 

OBJECTIVES

  • To be familiar with the main stages of civilization as an expanding force which has produced important forms of political, social, economic, and cultural organization which are our common heritage;  
  • To identify major events, persons, and ideas which contributed to the development of western, including American, and non-western attitudes and institutions; 
  • To develop concepts which give meaning and order to the raw material of man's recorded past; 
  • To identify and to analyze significant problems and situations as they relate to the continuing issues of contemporary life. 

 

GOALS

  • To improve understanding of the major events which have influenced the modern world; 
  • To understand the influence of the past on contemporary events and problems; 
  • To be an intelligent consumer and evaluator of information about events taking place in the world; 
  • To develop a global perspective which recognizes the political, economic, and cultural interdependence of all nations. 

 

CORE 132: The 20th Century: A Global Perspective

A Global Perspective is the second course in the Civilization sequence of the CORE Curriculum.

Historical literacy is essential to the education of the professional man or woman of the 21st century and his or her ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects varied and appropriate traditions. The 20th Century: A Global Perspective focuses on issues, events, and crises which have influenced and been influenced by the role of the United States in the world in the twentieth century. The major political, social, economic, and cultural events and forces of this period will be examined in this course.

 

Specific Benefits of CORE 132: The 20th Century: A Global Perspective

  • It hones skill at evaluating data for authenticity or spuriousness, reliability or unreliability; it trains the mind to weigh and to ponder before acceptance or rejection. 
  • It expands understanding and knowledge of the world in which we live. 
  • It encourages the development of independent thinking, as well as the application of deductive and inductive reasoning, in the formation and validation of hypotheses and conclusions. 
  • It compels acknowledgment of the complexity and variety of the human experience and encourages a sensitivity to the myriad values and perspectives which have often been at conflict. 
  • It confronts us with the moral problem of making judgments about those who occupied center stage in world history in this period. 
  • It stimulates and develops problem-solving, skeptical judgment and decision-making analysis. 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

TEXTBOOK

Goff, Moss, et al. THE TWENTIETH CENTURY: A Brief Global History. Sixth Edition.  New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2002. 

 

READING ASSIGNMENTS

The General Course Outline identifies specific readings from your text.  You should plan to read at least two chapters per week in order to prepare yourself for class discussion.  There will be additional readings announced in class.

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ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:

Any form of academic dishonesty (plagiarism, etc.), as discussed in your Student Handbook, can result in a failing grade in the course and additional action by college officials.  Let this be a “word to the wise” on the importance of citing sources properly!

 

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS

Three (3) brief research papers will be assigned.  Due dates, guidelines and topics for each assignment will be distributed as appropriate. Exploration of various research resources including the library and reliable on-line sources will be encouraged in the completion of these assignments. Upper-class students will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in applying the writing and critical thinking developed in CORE 110 and CORE 100. All students will be expected to submit papers in typed or word processed form.

***Handwritten work will NOT be accepted.  Papers not submitted on time will be severely penalized by two (2) points per day.  No papers will be accepted after your last class on December 10!

 

TESTS

There will be three (3) written tests given during the semester including the final examination. The first two tests are listed in your course outline.  The third (final) examination will be given according to the Registrar's examination schedule. The tests will be based on the lectures and text reading materials, as assigned.    The general structure of the tests may be identification, multiple choice, short answer and/or essay. Each test will be non-comprehensive and will review the most recent materials covered.

 

QUIZZES AND EXTRA-CREDIT

Throughout the semester there may be quizzes and extra-credit assignments given to help you acquire, maintain, or (just maybe?) exceed your grade goal.

 

CLASSROOM PARTICIPATION

Regular participation is expected from each student.  Your participation will be noted and weighed in the overall semester grade evaluation (10%) as a growth/development factor.

 

ATTENDANCE

As learning partners, you and I are expected to attend classroom lectures/discussions on a regular basis.  Students are responsible for all materials discussed and be prepared to actively participate in lectures and classroom discussions.  I am responsible for the presentation of subject matter in an environment conducive to your learning experience.  Rules of the College regarding class attendance will be followed strictly.  There will be a MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE ABSENCE of THREE (3) - excused OR unexcused. Students arriving after the roll is taken will be marked absent and must meet with the professor after class if they wish to have the absence changed.  Absence on the day of a scheduled test will NOT be excused unless a serious reason has been explained to the instructor (in advance, if possible) and arrangements for a make-up test are made within five (5) class days of the scheduled test.  It is the RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT to arrange the make-up with the professor.  It will be within the discretion of the professor to permit any and all exceptions to these rules based on the evidence presented.  Three consecutive absences or a pattern of absence (or lateness) over a three week period will initiate an Excessive Absence Report to the College Student Services Office. 

 

SEMESTER GRADE EVALUATION

The determination of the final semester grade will be based on the successful completion of all requirements for the course using numerical values as follows:

•  Tests: Total - 60% = Tests I, II, and III - 60% (20% each)

•  Written Assignments -30% ( each 10%)

•  Participation - 10%

 

GRADING SCALE:

The general grading scale to be used is as follows:

A+ = 98           A = 95             A- = 92

B+ = 88           B = 85             B- = 82

C+ = 78           C = 75             C- = 72

D+ = 68           D = 65             F   = 59

 

OFFICE CONTACT / OFFICE HOURS

*Personal consultations are welcome and encouraged.

*Test reviews and "rough drafts" of papers are strongly encouraged during office hours or at other convenient times.

Office: HM 312

Office Hours: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.

                        Other times by appointment.

Phone:  208-5900 Ext. 5637

             Messages may be left with the Faculty Assistants in Hafey Marian Hall, 208-5900 - Ext. 5702.

E-mail:  sjkase@kings.edu


GENERAL COURSE OUTLINE  (May be adjusted at the discretion of the instructor.)

 

INTRODUCTION

            The Dawn of the Twentieth Century

PART I

            The Era of Imperialism

                        The Major World Powers

                        The Origins of World War I

                        World War I

PART II

            The Era of Revolution and War

                        Postwar Settlements

                        Russian Revolutions

                        The United States 1918-1940

                        Dictatorships vs. Democracy

                        The Origins of World War II

                        World War II

PART III

            The Era of the Cold War and the Collapse of Empires

                        Postwar Settlements - Collapse of Empires – The Early Cold War

                        The United States and Latin America after World War II

                        Asia in the Aftermath of World War II

                        Africa

                        The Middle-East

                        The Cold War

PART IV

            The Post Cold War Period

            On to the Twenty-First Century

 

 

TEST DATES

Test #1 -- October 4, 2004

Test #2 – November 8, 2004

Final Exam:  Scheduled by the Registrar (Week of December 13-17)

 

 

PAPER DUE DATES

Paper #1 – September  27, 2004

Paper #2 – November 3, 2004

Paper #3 – December 6, 2004

 

OTHER IMPORTANT DATES TO REMEMBER

September 6:   Labor Day – No Classes

October 15–17:   Fall Recess – No Classes

October 22-24:  King’s Homecoming

November 24-28:  Thanksgiving Recess – No Classes

December 10:  Last Class

Library Internet Resources

Library of Congress Government Guide

Internet Public Library, President of the United States

SANDRA MIHOCH KASE