Welcome to the King’s College Philosophy Core Web Site

 

Category Description

Philosophy (6 credits)
Philosophy plays a vital role in a liberal arts education. Studies in philosophy provide basic cultural literacy regarding the great thinkers and perennial issues in our philosophical heritage and a strong foundation in logical reasoning. As a result, philosophy makes a significant contribution to the ability of our students to recognize truth and justice in the world that surrounds them. In addition, philosophy course offerings are dedicated to achieving the Mission of King’s College in that they not only direct students toward the tools they need to make a living, but also guide them toward a better understanding of how to live. These course offerings examine issues related to living a fulfilling life, such as ethics, aesthetics, theories of knowledge, and metaphysics. The free and inquiring mind pursues questions about what ought to be believed about the human condition, about human destiny and about how to conduct a meaningful human life. The study of philosophy is essential to this pursuit.

 

Objectives

(1)    to become familiar with the significant contributions of the major philosophers to the timeless questions and enduring problems encountered in the progress of human existence;

(2)    to engage in dialogue with the texts of the philosophers in order to enlarge and correct perspective;

(3)    to begin to develop a critically reflective set of beliefs to guide the direction of life, so as to learn how to live rightly;

(4)    to critically understand and to objectively assess differing philosophical positions and commitment;

(5)    to appreciate the contributions and limits of culture to understanding and to delight in the richness of various cultural presentations and to effectively critique those which are repressive of human dignity;

(6)    to realize the relevance of ethical reflection and decision making in personal life, in business, in government in science, in the academy, and in all social and cultural institutions;

(7)    to discern the philosophical ideas that provide the underpinnings for social, political, and cultural institutions;

(8)    to appreciate the value of philosophical reflection for the clarification of current social and political problems and for the advancement of appropriate human solutions;

(9)    to show in written work, both critical and argumentative, the understanding of complex philosophical ideas, arguments, and moral judgments and to evaluate the evidence and reasoning offered in support of these ideas, arguments, and moral judgments;

(10) to be open to the search for truth and wisdom.

Goals

(1)    to acquire insight into the questions and problems of the contemporary society from the recovery of the wisdom of the past;

(2)    to form the habit of philosophizing by engaging in the excitement and the discipline of thinking carefully and critically about fundamental philosophical positions;

(3)    to learn to think independently in a manner which includes the ability to assess, define, and revise positions and beliefs;

(4)    to be aware of and to honestly and courageously scrutinize assumptions based on wishful thinking, unexamined dogmas, or prejudice;

(5)    to become familiar with and to contribute to the solution of the complex ethical problems encountered in an increasingly technological society;

(6)    to assess a course of action in terms of its long range effects on the individual and on the common good;

(7)    to understand and respect the philosophical positions of others;

(8)    to critique with respect and evidence divergent philosophical positions;

(9)    to write both a critical paper and an argumentative paper within the Core in philosophy;

    (10)  to seek truth and wisdom.

 

Courses Offered: Spring 2013

Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to the central problems and major figures in the history of philosophical thought. Topics include the meaning and purpose of human existence, the ultimate nature of reality, the foundations and limits of human understanding, the foundations and limits of government, the basic norms of right and wrong.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: The Creative Vision of Alfred Hitchcock
An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this course, students explore classic philosophical questions by exploring the cinematic artistry of master filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 286: Ethics and the Good Life
This course is designed to give the student a nose for moral argumentation—the ability to distinguish good moral reasoning from bad and to sniff out mistakes in every day moral thought. It aims, through the close reading and discussion of ethical texts and cases, to foster in students a personal and reflectively stable moral sensibility, and to equip them to make fruitful contributions to moral and political discussion in the public arena. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 287: Business Ethics
An examination of the major ethical issues and dilemmas facing contemporary business in the light of the major theories of ethics. The course first addresses several challenges to the very idea of Business Ethics such as relativism, egoism, and the applicability of moral concepts to corporations. It then uses the case method to focus on the justice of capitalism as an economic system, ethics in the marketplace, business and the environment, the ethics of consumer production and marketing, and the ethics of the employee/employer relationship. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 281: Introduction to Logic
The principal aim of logic is to develop a system of methods and principles that may be used as criteria for evaluating the arguments of others and as guides in constructing arguments of one's own. This course emphasizes formal logic, particularly propositional and categorical logic.

Core 288: Bioethics
Bioethics studies the intersection of law, morality, science and medicine as the human good is pursued for the person as patient or subject. Among the topics studied are medical-ethical codes, informed consent, advance directives, abortion, euthanasia, suicide, assisted suicide in the medical context, reproductive technologies, sterilization, and the delivery of health care. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Courses Offered: Fall 2012

Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to the central problems and major figures in the history of philosophical thought. Topics include the meaning and purpose of human existence, the ultimate nature of reality, the foundations and limits of human understanding, the foundations and limits of government, the basic norms of right and wrong.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Popular Culture and Philosophy
More and more, popular media deals with philosophical issues. Movies—such as Dead Man Walking, The Matrix and Artificial Intelligence—raise issues from capital punishment to skepticism and philosophy of mind. Television shows—such as South Park, Lost, Heroes, Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica—raises issues political, ethical and metaphysical. This provides us with a springboard from which to explore these issues. In this class, this is what we will do. We will not have time to explore them all, but we will address issues raised by a number of popular works. We will explore issues religious, ethical and metaphysical. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Death and the Meaning of Life
How should we think about death? And how is death connected with the human quest for meaning? This course will examine a number of issues that arise once we begin to reflect on our mortality. What does it mean to say that a person has died? Are we, in some sense, immortal? Would an immortal life actually be desirable? Is death an evil, something to be feared? Can we be harmed by things that occur after our death? Is suicide ever rational or morally permissible? How should I live given the certainty of death? Is there some objective, overarching meaning or purpose to life? If not, can I endow my life with meaning through my own personal choices and commitments? Or could it be, as nihilists claim, that life is “absurd” and has no meaning at all? Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: The Creative Vision of Alfred Hitchcock
An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this course, students explore classic philosophical questions by exploring the cinematic artistry of master filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 284: Environmental Ethics
This course will explore the ways philosophical analysis can be applied to environmental issues. Students will study a variety of ethical positions philosophers have offered regarding the environment, and will learn some of the challenges environmental problems pose for ethical theory. Students will also learn to recognize and assess philosophical presuppositions behind debates over environmental issues, and will work toward developing their own reasoned points of view toward the environment. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 286: Ethics and the Good Life
This course is designed to give the student a nose for moral argumentation—the ability to distinguish good moral reasoning from bad and to sniff out mistakes in every day moral thought. It aims, through the close reading and discussion of ethical texts and cases, to foster in students a personal and reflectively stable moral sensibility, and to equip them to make fruitful contributions to moral and political discussion in the public arena. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 287: Business Ethics
An examination of the major ethical issues and dilemmas facing contemporary business in the light of the major theories of ethics. The course first addresses several challenges to the very idea of Business Ethics such as relativism, egoism, and the applicability of moral concepts to corporations. It then uses the case method to focus on the justice of capitalism as an economic system, ethics in the marketplace, business and the environment, the ethics of consumer production and marketing, and the ethics of the employee/employer relationship. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Courses Offered: Spring 2012

Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to the central problems and major figures in the history of philosophical thought. Topics include the meaning and purpose of human existence, the ultimate nature of reality, the foundations and limits of human understanding, the foundations and limits of government, the basic norms of right and wrong.

Core 281: Introduction to Logic
The principal aim of logic is to develop a system of methods and principles that may be used as criteria for evaluating the arguments of others and as guides in constructing arguments of one's own. This course emphasizes formal logic, particularly propositional and categorical logic.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Science and Religion
Are religion and science opposed to one another? Does science show that religious beliefs are unreasonable or irrational? Was the universe created? Does the universe have a purpose? Is life ultimately reducible to chemistry? Do recent developments in physics provide support for traditional religious beliefs? Are there inherent limits to what science can tell us about the nature of reality? Should a scientist’s religious beliefs make any difference in the way she approaches her scientific work? This course will explore these and other important issues in the contemporary dialogue between science and religion. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Death and the Meaning of Life
How should we think about death? And how is death connected with the human quest for meaning? This course will examine a number of issues that arise once we begin to reflect on our mortality. What does it mean to say that a person has died? Are we, in some sense, immortal? Would an immortal life actually be desirable? Is death an evil, something to be feared? Can we be harmed by things that occur after our death? Is suicide ever rational or morally permissible? How should I live given the certainty of death? Is there some objective, overarching meaning or purpose to life? If not, can I endow my life with meaning through my own personal choices and commitments? Or could it be, as nihilists claim, that life is “absurd” and has no meaning at all? Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: The Creative Vision of Alfred Hitchcock
An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this course, students explore classic philosophical questions by exploring the cinematic artistry of master filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 286: Ethics and the Good Life
This course is designed to give the student a nose for moral argumentation—the ability to distinguish good moral reasoning from bad and to sniff out mistakes in every day moral thought. It aims, through the close reading and discussion of ethical texts and cases, to foster in students a personal and reflectively stable moral sensibility, and to equip them to make fruitful contributions to moral and political discussion in the public arena. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 287: Business Ethics
An examination of the major ethical issues and dilemmas facing contemporary business in the light of the major theories of ethics. The course first addresses several challenges to the very idea of Business Ethics such as relativism, egoism, and the applicability of moral concepts to corporations. It then uses the case method to focus on the justice of capitalism as an economic system, ethics in the marketplace, business and the environment, the ethics of consumer production and marketing, and the ethics of the employee/employer relationship. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 288: Bioethics Bioethics studies the intersection of law, morality, science and medicine as the human good is pursued for the person as patient or subject. Among the topics studied are medical-ethical codes, informed consent, advance directives, abortion, euthanasia, suicide, assisted suicide in the medical context, reproductive technologies, sterilization, and the delivery of health care. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Courses Offered: Fall 2011

Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to the central problems and major figures in the history of philosophical thought. Topics include the meaning and purpose of human existence, the ultimate nature of reality, the foundations and limits of human understanding, the foundations and limits of government, the basic norms of right and wrong.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Death and the Meaning of Life
How should we think about death? And how is death connected with the human quest for meaning? This course will examine a number of issues that arise once we begin to reflect on our mortality. What does it mean to say that a person has died? Are we, in some sense, immortal? Would an immortal life actually be desirable? Is death an evil, something to be feared? Can we be harmed by things that occur after our death? Is suicide ever rational or morally permissible? How should I live given the certainty of death? Is there some objective, overarching meaning or purpose to life? If not, can I endow my life with meaning through my own personal choices and commitments? Or could it be, as nihilists claim, that life is “absurd” and has no meaning at all? Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Popular Culture and Philosophy
More and more, popular media deals with philosophical issues. Movies—such as Dead Man Walking, The Matrix and Artificial Intelligence—raise issues from capital punishment to skepticism and philosophy of mind. Television shows—such as South Park, Lost, Heroes, Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica—raises issues political, ethical and metaphysical. This provides us with a springboard from which to explore these issues. In this class, this is what we will do. We will not have time to explore them all, but we will address issues raised by a number of popular works. We will explore issues religious, ethical and metaphysical. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 286: Ethics and the Good Life
This course is designed to give the student a nose for moral argumentation—the ability to distinguish good moral reasoning from bad and to sniff out mistakes in every day moral thought. It aims, through the close reading and discussion of ethical texts and cases, to foster in students a personal and reflectively stable moral sensibility, and to equip them to make fruitful contributions to moral and political discussion in the public arena. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Courses Offered: Spring 2011

Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to the central problems and major figures in the history of philosophical thought. Topics include the meaning and purpose of human existence, the ultimate nature of reality, the foundations and limits of human understanding, the foundations and limits of government, the basic norms of right and wrong.

Core 281: Introduction to Logic
The principal aim of logic is to develop a system of methods and principles that may be used as criteria for evaluating the arguments of others and as guides in constructing arguments of one's own. This course emphasizes formal logic, particularly propositional and categorical logic.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Science and Religion
Are religion and science opposed to one another? Does science show that religious beliefs are unreasonable or irrational? Was the universe created? Does the universe have a purpose? Is life ultimately reducible to chemistry? Do recent developments in physics provide support for traditional religious beliefs? Are there inherent limits to what science can tell us about the nature of reality? Should a scientist’s religious beliefs make any difference in the way she approaches her scientific work? This course will explore these and other important issues in the contemporary dialogue between science and religion. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: The Creative Vision of Alfred Hitchcock
An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this course, students explore classic philosophical questions by exploring the cinematic artistry of master filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 284: Philosophy of Human Nature
What is a human person? What is the human condition? What factors influence human life, choice, and action? What is human destiny? These questions concerning humanity are philosophical questions, and it is the general purpose of this course to expose the student to the ways serious thinkers have approached and understood them. The course addresses such topics as: humanity’s origin and evolution; humanity’s place in the universe; the impact of human, scientific, technological and creative achievement; the relationship between human beings and God; and humanity’s ultimate destiny. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 285: Eastern Philosophy
This course is a topical survey of Eastern philosophy. The topics addressed include: ethics, death, reality, self, and knowledge. The schools of Eastern philosophy studied include: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism. In studying eastern philosophy students will be exposed to, and learn appreciation for, different perspectives on traditional philosophical issues. Students will develop and refine the ability to offer criticism of philosophical positions, and will develop the ability to form their own educated views on philosophical issues. . Prerequisite: Core 280. Crosslisted with Phil 385.

Core 287: Business Ethics
An examination of the major ethical issues and dilemmas facing contemporary business in the light of the major theories of ethics. The course first addresses several challenges to the very idea of Business Ethics such as relativism, egoism, and the applicability of moral concepts to corporations. It then uses the case method to focus on the justice of capitalism as an economic system, ethics in the marketplace, business and the environment, the ethics of consumer production and marketing, and the ethics of the employee/employer relationship. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 288: Bioethics Bioethics studies the intersection of law, morality, science and medicine as the human good is pursued for the person as patient or subject. Among the topics studied are medical-ethical codes, informed consent, advance directives, abortion, euthanasia, suicide, assisted suicide in the medical context, reproductive technologies, sterilization, and the delivery of health care. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Courses Offered: Fall 2010

Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to the central problems and major figures in the history of philosophical thought. Topics include the meaning and purpose of human existence, the ultimate nature of reality, the foundations and limits of human understanding, the foundations and limits of government, the basic norms of right and wrong.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Pop Culture and Philosophy
More and more, popular media deals with philosophical issues. Movies—such as Dead Man Walking, The Matrix and Artificial Intelligence—raise issues from capital punishment to skepticism and philosophy of mind. Television shows—such as South Park, Lost, Heroes, Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica—raises issues political, ethical and metaphysical. This provides us with a springboard from which to explore these issues. In this class, this is what we will do. We will not have time to explore them all, but we will address issues raised by a number of popular works. We will explore issues religious, ethical and metaphysical. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: The Creative Vision of Alfred Hitchcock
An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this course, students explore classic philosophical questions by exploring the cinematic artistry of master filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Death and the Meaning of Life
This course explores human responses to death. How should we think about death? Is death something to be feared? Is there an afterlife? Does death show that life is ultimately meaningless? How should we live given the certainty of death? This class explores these other perennial questions about death and meaning through the reading of classic and contemporary philosophers. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 286: Ethics and the Good Life
This course is designed to give the student a nose for moral argumentation—the ability to distinguish good moral reasoning from bad and to sniff out mistakes in every day moral thought. It aims, through the close reading and discussion of ethical texts and cases, to foster in students a personal and reflectively stable moral sensibility, and to equip them to make fruitful contributions to moral and political discussion in the public arena. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 287: Business Ethics
An examination of the major ethical issues and dilemmas facing contemporary business in the light of the major theories of ethics. The course first addresses several challenges to the very idea of Business Ethics such as relativism, egoism, and the applicability of moral concepts to corporations. It then uses the case method to focus on the justice of capitalism as an economic system, ethics in the marketplace, business and the environment, the ethics of consumer production and marketing, and the ethics of the employee/employer relationship. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

 

Courses Offered: Spring 2010

 

Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to the central problems and major figures in the history of philosophical thought. Topics include the meaning and purpose of human existence, the ultimate nature of reality, the foundations and limits of human understanding, the foundations and limits of government, the basic norms of right and wrong.

Core 281: Introduction to Logic

The principal aim of logic is to develop a system of methods and principles that may be used as criteria for evaluating the arguments of others and as guides in constructing arguments of one's own. This course emphasizes formal logic, particularly propositional and categorical logic.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Science Fiction and Philosophy

An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this course, students explore classic philosophical questions by reading science fiction. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Science and Religion

Are religion and science opposed to one another? Does science show that religious beliefs are unreasonable or irrational? Was the universe created? Does the universe have a purpose? Is life ultimately reducible to chemistry? Do recent developments in physics provide support for traditional religious beliefs? Are there inherent limits to what science can tell us about the nature of reality? Should a scientist’s religious beliefs make any difference in the way she approaches her scientific work? This course will explore these and other important issues in the contemporary dialogue between science and religion. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: The Creative Vision of Alfred Hitchcock

An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this course, students explore classic philosophical questions by exploring the cinematic artistry of master filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 284: Philosophy of Human Nature

What is a human person? What is the human condition? What factors influence human life, choice, and action? What is human destiny? These questions concerning humanity are philosophical questions, and it is the general purpose of this course to expose the student to the ways serious thinkers have approached and understood them. The course addresses such topics as: humanity’s origin and evolution; humanity’s place in the universe; the impact of human, scientific, technological and creative achievement; the relationship between human beings and God; and humanity’s ultimate destiny. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 286: Ethics and the Good Life

This course is designed to give the student a nose for moral argumentation—the ability to distinguish good moral reasoning from bad and to sniff out mistakes in every day moral thought. It aims, through the close reading and discussion of ethical texts and cases, to foster in students a personal and reflectively stable moral sensibility, and to equip them to make fruitful contributions to moral and political discussion in the public arena. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 287: Business Ethics

An examination of the major ethical issues and dilemmas facing contemporary business in the light of the major theories of ethics. The course first addresses several challenges to the very idea of Business Ethics such as relativism, egoism, and the applicability of moral concepts to corporations. It then uses the case method to focus on the justice of capitalism as an economic system, ethics in the marketplace, business and the environment, the ethics of consumer production and marketing, and the ethics of the employee/employer relationship. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 288: Bioethics Bioethics studies the intersection of law, morality, science and medicine as the human good is pursued for the person as patient or subject. Among the topics studied are medical-ethical codes, informed consent, advance directives, abortion, euthanasia, suicide, assisted suicide in the medical context, reproductive technologies, sterilization, and the delivery of health care. Prerequisite: Core 280.

 

 

Courses Offered: Fall 2009

 

Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to the central problems and major figures in the history of philosophical thought. Topics include the meaning and purpose of human existence, the ultimate nature of reality, the foundations and limits of human understanding, the foundations and limits of government, the basic norms of right and wrong.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: The Creative Vision of Alfred Hitchcock

An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this course, students explore classic philosophical questions by exploring the cinematic artistry of master filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Death and the Meaning of Life

An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this class, students explore issues of death and dying, and how those issues impinge on conceptions of the meaning of life. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Pop Culture and Philosophy

More and more, popular media deals with philosophical issues. Movies—such as Dead Man Walking, The Matrix and Artificial Intelligence—raise issues from capital punishment to skepticism and philosophy of mind.  Television shows—such as South Park, Lost, Heroes, Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica—raises issues political, ethical and metaphysical. This provides us with a springboard from which to explore these issues. In this class, this is what we will do. We will not have time to explore them all, but we will address issues raised by a number of popular works.  We will explore issues religious, ethical and metaphysical.

Prerequisite: Core 280.

 

Core 284: Philosophy of Human Nature

What is a human person? What is the human condition? What factors influence human life, choice, and action? What is human destiny? These questions concerning humanity are philosophical questions, and it is the general purpose of this course to expose the student to the ways serious thinkers have approached and understood them. The course addresses such topics as: humanity’s origin and evolution; humanity’s place in the universe; the impact of human, scientific, technological and creative achievement; the relationship between human beings and God; and humanity’s ultimate destiny. Prerequisite: Core 280.

Core 286: Ethics and the Good Life

This course is designed to give the student a nose for moral argumentation—the ability to distinguish good moral reasoning from bad and to sniff out mistakes in every day moral thought. It aims, through the close reading and discussion of ethical texts and cases, to foster in students a personal and reflectively stable moral sensibility, and to equip them to make fruitful contributions to moral and political discussion in the public arena. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

Core 287: Business Ethics

An examination of the major ethical issues and dilemmas facing contemporary business in the light of the major theories of ethics. The course first addresses several challenges to the very idea of Business Ethics such as relativism, egoism, and the applicability of moral concepts to corporations. It then uses the case method to focus on the justice of capitalism as an economic system, ethics in the marketplace, business and the environment, the ethics of consumer production and marketing, and the ethics of the employee/employer relationship. Prerequisite: CORE 280.

 

Courses Offered: Spring 2009
Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to the central problems and major figures in the history of philosophical thought. Topics include the meaning and purpose of human existence, the ultimate nature of reality, the foundations and limits of human understanding, the foundations and limits of government, the basic norms of right and wrong.
Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Science Fiction and Philosophy
An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this course, students explore classic philosophical questions by reading science fiction. Prerequisite: Core 280.
Core 282: Philosophical Themes: Death and the Meaning of Life
An exploration of one of the main areas of philosophy: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, or aesthetics. The courses offered in this category are intended to build upon the historical introductions to the main areas of philosophy that students receive in the first philosophy course. Each course in this category will provide students with introductory readings from those philosophers who distinguish themselves in a specific field of philosophy. In this class, students explore issues of death and dying, and how those issues impinge on conceptions of the meaning of life. Prerequisite: Core 280.
Core 284: Philosophy of Human Nature
What is a human person? What is the human condition? What factors influence human life, choice, and action? What is human destiny? These questions concerning humanity are philosophical questions, and it is the general purpose of this course to expose the student to the ways serious thinkers have approached and understood them. The course addresses such topics as: humanity’s origin and evolution; humanity’s place in the universe; the impact of human, scientific, technological and creative achievement; the relationship between human beings and God; and humanity’s ultimate destiny. Prerequisite: Core 280.
Core 286: Ethics and the Good Life
This course is designed to give the student a nose for moral argumentation—the ability to distinguish good moral reasoning from bad and to sniff out mistakes in every day moral thought. It aims, through the close reading and discussion of ethical texts and cases, to foster in students a personal and reflectively stable moral sensibility, and to equip them to make fruitful contributions to moral and political discussion in the public arena. Prerequisite: CORE 280.
Core 287: Business Ethics
An examination of the major ethical issues and dilemmas facing contemporary business in the light of the major theories of ethics. The course first addresses several challenges to the very idea of Business Ethics such as relativism, egoism, and the applicability of moral concepts to corporations. It then uses the case method to focus on the justice of capitalism as an economic system, ethics in the marketplace, business and the environment, the ethics of consumer production and marketing, and the ethics of the employee/employer relationship. Prerequisite: CORE 280.
Core 288: Bioethics
Bioethics studies the intersection of law, morality, science and medicine as the human good is pursued for the person as patient or subject. Among the topics studied are medical-ethical codes, informed consent, advance directives, abortion, euthanasia, suicide, assisted suicide in the medical context, reproductive technologies, sterilization, and the delivery of health care. Prerequisite: Core 280.

 

Master Syllabi

Core 280: Introduction to Philosophy Download Core 280 PDF or Word Document

Core 281: Introduction to Logic Download Core 281 PDF or Word Document

Core 282: Philosophical Themes Download Core 282 PDF or Word Document

Core 283: Philosophy of Education Download Core 283 PDF or Word Document

Core 284: Philosophy of Human Nature Download Core 284 PDF or Word Document

Core 285: Eastern Philosophy Download Core 285 PDF or Word Document

Core 286: Ethics and the Good Life Download Core 286 PDF or Word Document

Core 287: Business Ethics Download Core 287 PDF or Word Document

Core 288: Bioethics Download Core 288 PDF or Word Document

For more information on the King’s College Philosophy department, visit the department’s web site by clicking here.