CORE Literature Offerings--Spring 2013:

CORE 161A Introduction to Literature
Mr. Brian S. Stiles
(MWF 8:00-8:50 am, Hafey-Marian 511)
An examination of major literary works that provide a unique perspective on human experience and society. Emphasis is placed on developing close reading and interpretation skills through the analysis of literary texts. Special attention will be given to relations between thematic content and formal properties and readings must include key works of poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction from a range of historical moments and cultural contexts.

CORE 161B Introduction to Literature
Rev. Anthony Grasso
(MWF 11:00-11:50 am, McGowan 324)
An examination of major literary works that provide a unique perspective on human experience and society. Emphasis is placed on developing close reading and interpretation skills through the analysis of literary texts. Special attention will be given to relations between thematic content and formal properties and readings must include key works of poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction from a range of historical moments and cultural contexts.

CORE 161C Introduction to Literature
Dr. Corine Coniglio
(TTh 12:30-1:45 pm, Hafey-Marian 610)
An examination of major literary works that provide a unique perspective on human experience and society. Emphasis is placed on developing close reading and interpretation skills through the analysis of literary texts. Special attention will be given to relations between thematic content and formal properties and readings must include key works of poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction from a range of historical moments and cultural contexts.

CORE 162A Literatures of Poland and Czecho-Slovakia
Dr. Charles S. Kraszewski
(TTh 9:30-10:45 am, Hafey-Marian 610)
An overview of the major writers of Poland, and the Czech and Slovak Republics, vibrant contemporary traditions reaching back to the Middle Ages. We will consider poetry, drama and prose fiction written by Poles, Czechs, and Slovaks in a chronological scheme stretching from the Great Moravian Empire of the ninth century, through the twentieth century. Because the literary traditions of these nations were especially influenced by history, each literary period discussed will be set against the rich historical and cultural traditions of Poland, and the Czech and Slovak lands. Specific authors to be discussed include: Jan Kochanowski, Jan Amos Komensky, Maciej Kazimierz Sarbiewski, Ignacy Krasicki, Adam Mickiewicz, Ludovit Stur, Karel Hynek Macha, Stanislaw Wyspianski, Jaroslav Hasek, Karel Capek, Witold Gombrowicz, Jozef Ciger-Hronsky, Jan Zahradnicek, Vaclav Havel, Stanislaw Baranczak, and more. Course website: staff.kings.edu/charleskraszewski/Site/162.html. FULFILLS CORE LITERATURE REQUIREMENT; A GREAT PREPARATION FOR STUDENTS INTERESTED IN THIS SUMMER'S SHORT TERM STUDY ABROAD EXPERIENCE IN KRAKOW, PRAGUE AND BRATISLAVA.

CORE 163A England: The Early Years
Dr. Megan Lloyd
(MWF 9:00-9:50 am, Administration 204)
From Beowulf to Ben Jonson, this course examines the beginnings of English literature and samples the variety of languages, literatures and peoples of ancient Britain that fostered and developed into the early modern English literature of Shakespeare, Sidney, Marlowe and Milton. Topics for discussion will include chivalry, Arthurian legend, courtly love, patronage, the pastoral, the sonnet, theater, and the epic.

CORE 164A Environmental Literature
Dr. Neal Bukeavich
(TTh 11:00-12:15 pm, Hafey-Marian 601)
This course offers a broad introduction to environmental--or nature-oriented--literature. We will read, discuss, and analyze various literary works concerned with humankind's relationship with the natural world. The course will allow students to examine two fundamental and generally antagonistic responses to "nature": the Baconian desire to master the world by exploiting its resources and developing ever-more sophisticated technologies to maintain or raise living standards; and the wish to return to a golden age of which human desires and natural resources purportedly existed in what we now call ecological balance. We'll read one or two novels, watch one or two films, and work through a variety of poems, short stories, and essays. Authors include Geoffrey Chaucer, Aphra Behn, Andrew Marvell, William Wordsworth, Henry David Thoreau, E.M. Forster, Rachel Carson, Wendell Berry, Ursula K. le Guin, Richard Powers, and T.C. Boyle. Graded assignments include regular reading quizzes, two exams, and two interpretive essays.

CORE 164B American Gothic
Dr. Michael Little
(TTh 12:00-1:15 pm, Administration 203)
This course will examine depictions of horror and terror in American literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Gothic literature exaggerates our individual and cultural fears (of the unknown, the supernatural, the irrational, the repressed, the monstrous, and the grotesque, for example) in order to help us examine and confront them. Essentially, gothic literature helps us to think about who we are as individuals and as a society by examining our fears. We will read authors such as Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Henry James, Flannery O'Connor, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, and others.

CORE 164C Immigrant Fictions
Dr. Robin E. Field
(TTh 2:00-3:15 pm, Hafey-Marian 211)
This course will examine the experience of immigrants in America in the 20th century in literature and film. We will ponder: How do immigrants see America? And how does America view immigrants? What does ├Čthe American dream├« mean to immigrants? And how do they achieve it? What is the meaning of home? We will study the range of immigrant experiences by reading such authors as Anzia Yezierska, Bernard Malamud, Hisaye Yamamoto, John Okada, Bharati Mukherjee, Doreen Baingana, Julia Alvarez, and Junot Diaz. Possible films include The Immigrant, El Norte, Maria Full of Grace, The Namesake, Sweet Land, and In America.

CORE 164D Fairy Tale Themes in Literature
Dr. Laurie Sterling
(MW 2:00-3:15 pm, Hafey-Marian 511)
This course will begin with a study of traditional fairy tales and their interpretations. We will read versions of "Red Riding Hood," "Cinderella," "Snow White," "Rapunzel," "Jack and the Bean Stalk," "Hansel and Gretel," and "Bluebeard" (among others). Additionally, we will read analytical pieces about these tales. Once students are familiar with fairy tales, their meanings, and their uses, we will explore the ways that literature and film incorporate fairy tale elements and themes. Readings may include work by Salman Rushdie, Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood, and Anne Sexton.