CORE Literature Offerings--Fall 2012:

CORE 161A Introduction to Literature
Mr. Brian S. Stiles
(MWF 8:00-8:50 am, Administration 215)
An examination of major literary works that provide a unique perspective on human experience and society. Emphasis is placed on developing close reading and interpretation skills through the analysis of literary texts. Special attention will be given to relations between thematic content and formal properties and readings must include key works of poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction from a range of historical moments and cultural contexts.

CORE 161B Introduction to Literature
Dr. Laurie A. Sterling
(MW 2:00PM - 03:15 pm, Administration 215)
An examination of major literary works that provide a unique perspective on human experience and society. Emphasis is placed on developing close reading and interpretation skills through the analysis of literary texts. Special attention will be given to relations between thematic content and formal properties and readings must include key works of poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction from a range of historical moments and cultural contexts.

CORE 161C Introduction to Literature
Dr. Laurie A. Sterling
(TTh 9:30-10:45 am, Administration 215)
An examination of major literary works that provide a unique perspective on human experience and society. Emphasis is placed on developing close reading and interpretation skills through the analysis of literary texts. Special attention will be given to relations between thematic content and formal properties and readings must include key works of poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction from a range of historical moments and cultural contexts.

CORE 163A Other American Literature: Mexican, Canadian and Non-Anglo American Writers
Dr. Charles S. Kraszewski
(TTh 9:30-10:45 am, Hafey-Marian 211)
Although we are used to thinking about American literature in terms of literature written by United States citizens, there is a good reason why the peoples of Latin America refer to us as "Norteamericanos," rather than our preferred "American" label. All of the inhabitants of the American continents, from the Yukon Territory to Tierra del Fuego, are Americans, too. This course is intended to be a showcase for other important "American" writers, often overlooked in the U.S. college classroom. We will read and discuss works by Canadian authors (both English, like Charles Mair and French, like Hector de Saint-Denys Garneau and Philippe-Joseph Aubert de GaspÈ) Mexican authors such as Octavio Paz, Sor Juana de la Cruz and Tedi LÛpez Mills, writers from South America and the Caribbean (Jorge Luis Borges, JosÈ Marti), and U.S. citizens creative in languages other than English (Adrien Rouquette, Czeslaw Milosz, Rio Preisner). Our study will also be chronological, covering the centuries from the Spanish conquest of Mexico [Nahuatl accounts of the fall of Tenochtitlan] to the twenty-first century).

CORE 164A Contemporary Global Literature
Dr. Jennifer A. McClinton-Temple
(MWF 9:00-09:50 am, Hafey-Marian 510)
You may have heard of Salman Rushdie, the Indian author who spent over 10 years in hiding in fear for his life, but do you know what's in The Satanic Verses, the book that caused all the trouble in the first place? You may have enjoyed the film Bend it Like Beckham, but did you know that this entertaining film has a lot to say about gender, ethnicity, and immigration? You may have watched the World Cup in South Africa last year, but do you know how much this country has changed since its racist, imperialist past? A book like J.M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians can tell you. In this class, we will read works from around the world that reflect on the events, social movements and problems, and intellectual traditions of the late 20th century to the present. The focus of the class will be the interpretation and analysis of texts, and in order to perform these interpretations, we will have to consider factors such as art, culture, religion, history, gender, and ethnicity.

CORE 164B Literature and Labor
Dr. James M. Wallace
(MWF 11:00-11:50 am, Hafey-Marian 603)
Literature and Labor? Sounds like work, doesn't it? Considering how much of our lives are consumed in our jobs, why would we want to spend any of our free time studying literature about labor? Well, for one thing, imaginative expressions about work can be full of humor, emotion, poignancy and insight. And for another, literature about labor can help us answer questions regarding the value and meaning of what we do to earn a living. The readings in this course will provide a context for our discussion about the rewards and costs of working for ourselves and others. Although we'll examine the subjects of work and workers primarily in literature (poetry, stories, essays, autobiographies, drama), we'll also look at work depicted in other genresó film, television, music, painting and photography. We'll look at literature and art from the famous (Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales) to the lesser known, focusing on a wide range of professions and workers. We'll spend one unit in the course looking at the art and literature produced in the coal fields of Northeastern Pennsylvania. And we'll turn some of our attention to immigrant labor and the kind of work traditionally done by women.

CORE 164C Contemporary Global Literature
Dr. Jennifer A. McClinton-Temple
(MWF 1:00-1:50 pm, Hafey- Marian 213)
You may have heard of Salman Rushdie, the Indian author who spent over 10 years in hiding in fear for his life, but do you know what's in The Satanic Verses, the book that caused all the trouble in the first place? You may have enjoyed the film Bend it Like Beckham, but did you know that this entertaining film has a lot to say about gender, ethnicity, and immigration? You may have watched the World Cup in South Africa last year, but do you know how much this country has changed since its racist, imperialist past? A book like J.M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians can tell you. In this class, we will read works from around the world that reflect on the events, social movements and problems, and intellectual traditions of the late 20th century to the present. The focus of the class will be the interpretation and analysis of texts, and in order to perform these interpretations, we will have to consider factors such as art, culture, religion, history, gender, and ethnicity.

CORE 164D Utopian Literature
Dr. Charles S. Kraszewski
(TTh 11:00-11:50 am, Hafey-Marian 211)
There is a reason why Marxism, for example, looks good on paper, but never works in practice: the Golden Age, if there ever was one, cannot be recovered, and heaven, if there is one, will never be found on earth. This is one of the great lessons we obtain from reading works of Utopian literature: novels, plays and poetry describing the "perfect" society, which is always, as the English novelist Butler puts it, "Erehwon" (i.e. Nowhere). Because you can't legislate the human variable into smooth, polite grooves of angelic perfection, all Utopian literature, from St. Thomas More's work (which gives the genre its name) and Francis Bacon's Atlantis, tend to be as "distopian" as the works by Evgeny Zamiatin, George Orwell and others who set out to prove that the "perfect state" always tends to perfectly mar human perfection; that the equality touted by the prophets of Heaven on Earth is always an exercise in leveling: pulling down the ones "above," rather than raising up the ones "below." By considering the impossible dreams of even those Utopian writers creating their perfect worlds in good faith, we real people can behold our own actual societies in a helpful mirror. What, in our real world, can we do to make our communities better, more just, more livable? What things, however pleasant sounding, are simply beyond our means?

CORE 164E Immigrant Fictions
Dr. Robin E. Field
(M 6:00-8:30 pm, McGowan 201)
This course will examine the experience of immigrants in America in the 20th century in literature and film. We will ponder: How do immigrants see America? And how does America view immigrants? What does ìthe American dreamî mean to immigrants? And how do they achieve it? What is the meaning of home? We will study the range of immigrant experiences by reading such authors as Anzia Yezierska, Bernard Malamud, Hisaye Yamamoto, John Okada, Bharati Mukherjee, Doreen Baingana, Julia Alvarez, and Junot Diaz. Possible films include The Immigrant, El Norte, Maria Full of Grace, The Namesake, Sweet Land, and In America.