Spring 2010 Core-Literature Offerings

Core 162/A: Russian Literature in English (Kraszewski)
TTh, 12:30-1:45pm, Hafey-Marian 111
In this course, we will read key works by Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Lermontov, Gogol, and Chekhov. Our close readings of these texts will help us to understand, not only the influence that the great Russians had on the devlopment of poetry, prose realism, absurdist comic writing, and the naturalistic theater, but also how today’s Russian nation, which looks back with reverence to these authors, understands itself.  Readings include: Alexander Pushkin, Evgeny Onegin, Boris Godunov, and the "little tragedies"; Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time; Nikolay Gogol, The Government Inspector, stories; Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment; Anton Chekhov, Plays

Core 164/A: Immigrant Fictions (Field)
MWF, 9:00-9:50am, McGowan 109
This course will examine the experience of immigrants in America in the 20th century in literature and film. We will ponder: How do immigrants see America? And how does America view immigrants? What does “the American dream” mean to immigrants? And how do they achieveit?  What is the meaning of home? We will study the range of immigrant experiences by reading such authors as Anzia Yezierska, Bernard Malamud, Hisaye Yamamoto, John Okada, Bharati Mukherjee, Doreen Baingana, Julia Alvarez, and Junot Diaz. Possible films include The Immigrant, El Norte, Maria Full of Grace, The Namesake, Sweet Land, and In America.

Core 164/B: Detective Fiction (O’Connor)
MWF, 10:00-10:50am, Hafey-Marian 303
What could mystery stories set in France, Victorian England, 1930s Los Angeles, 1950s Harlem, 1960s San Francisco, and 1970s Manhattan have in common? How do they reflect and comment on the cultures that produced them? Why did Edgar Allen Poe, an American, write about a French detective? Why does Raymond Chandler’s famous detective, Philip Marlowe, constantly encounter sexual “deviancy” in The Big Sleep? Why does Thomas Pynchon’s heroine find a Renaissance-era mystery in 1960s California? These are some of the questions we will explore as we study one of the most popular forms of genre fiction: detective novels. We will also look at two or three film adaptations to see how a different medium transforms works of literature. Last, but not least, we’ll tackle the big question: just why have these sorts of stories remained so popular?

Core 164/C: Detective Fiction (O’Connor)
MWF, 11:00-11:50am, Hafey-Marian 213
What could mystery stories set in France, Victorian England, 1930s Los Angeles, 1950s Harlem, 1960s San Francisco, and 1970s Manhattan have in common? How do they reflect and comment on the cultures that produced them? Why did Edgar Allen Poe, an American, write about a French detective? Why does Raymond Chandler’s famous private eye, Philip Marlowe, constantly encounter sexual “deviancy” in The Big Sleep? Why does Thomas Pynchon’s heroine find a Renaissance-era mystery in 1960s California? These are some of the questions we will explore as we study one of the most popular forms of genre fiction: detective novels. We will also look at two or three film adaptations to see how a different medium transforms works of literature. Last, but not least, we’ll tackle the big question: just why have these sorts of stories remained so popular?

Core 164/D: Immigrant Fictions (Field)
MWF, 1:00-1:50pm, Hafey-Marian 603
This course will examine the experience of immigrants in America in the 20th century in literature and film. We will ponder: How do immigrants see America? And how does America view immigrants? What does “the American dream” mean to immigrants? And how do they achieveit? What is the meaning of home? We will study the range of immigrant experiences by reading such authors as Anzia Yezierska, Bernard Malamud, Hisaye Yamamoto, John Okada, Bharati Mukherjee, Doreen Baingana, Julia Alvarez, and Junot Diaz. Possible films include The Immigrant, El Norte, Maria Full of Grace, The Namesake, Sweet Land, and In America.

Core 164/F: Fairy Tale Themes in Literature (Sterling)
MW, 2:00-3:15pm, Hafey-Marian 303
This course will begin with a study of traditional fairy tales and their interpretations.  We will read versions of “Red Riding Hood,” “Cinderella,” “Snow White,” “Rapunzel,” “Jack and the Bean Stalk,” “Hansel and Gretel,” and “Bluebeard” (among others).  Additionally, we will read analytical pieces about these tales.  Once students are familiar with fairy tales, their meanings, and their uses, we will explore the ways that literature and film incorporate fairy tale elements and themes.  Readings may include work by Salman Rushdie, Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood, and Anne Sexton. 

Core 164/G: Fairy Tale Themes in Literature (Sterling)
TTh, 9:30-10:45am, Mulligan 211
This course will begin with a study of traditional fairy tales and their interpretations.  We will read versions of “Red Riding Hood,” “Cinderella,” “Snow White,” “Rapunzel,” “Jack and the Bean Stalk,” “Hansel and Gretel,” and “Bluebeard” (among others).  Additionally, we will read analytical pieces about these tales.  Once students are familiar with fairy tales, their meanings, and their uses, we will explore the ways that literature and film incorporate fairy tale elements and themes.  Readings may include work by Salman Rushdie, Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood, and Anne Sexton. 

Core 164/I: WWII in Literature and Film (Sanders) 
TTh, 11:00am-12:15pm, Mulligan 212
This course examines texts and films pertaining to World War II. Students will engage recurring themes, diverse viewpoints, and historical perspectives of this great struggle. Films such as A Midnight Clear, Catch-22, The Great Raid, Conspiracy, and Saints and Soldiers will be studied as significant works of art. Two longer readings are required: Night and Slaughterhouse-Five. Shorter fiction by James Jones, George Weller, William Faulkner, Kay Boyle, Irwin Shaw, and Noel Houston, among others, will also be studied. Included is poetry by James Dickey, John Ciardi, Howard Nemerov, Kenneth Koch, Phyllis McGinley, Robinson Jeffers, Randall Jarrell, Karl Shapiro, Archibald MacLeish, E.E. Cummings, and Dorothy Coffin Sussman. Requirements include participation in all assignments and projects, reaction papersfor films, a reflective literature journal, and an essay exam.