American Studies at King's College  

Course Archive

Fall 2008 | Spring 2009 | Fall 2009 | Spring 2010 | Fall 2010 | Spring 2011 | Fall 2011 | Spring 2012 | Fall 2012

Fall 2008

CORE 180A
The American Dream

Ms. Valerie Kepner

An introduction to the goals, methods, theories, and research findings associated with the various fields comprising the social sciences as they apply to the study of the American Dream. Students will analyze American behaviors and American institutions in order to understand the American Dream's influence on human behavior, the ways in which societies are organized in order to perpetuate or stifle the American Dream, and the interrelationships of various societal institutions as far as such interrelationships further (or not) the American Dream. Knowledge of the substance, motivation, and consequences of both individual and collective human behavior is essential to the liberally educated person. No educated person can hope to comprehend the complexity of contemporary society without some understanding of how that society is organized and how its various components relate to one another. Economic, political, psychological, historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives provide insights into human behavior and relationships in a complex world. This course will focus on the American Dream while incorporating the social science disciplines of economics, political science, anthropology, sociology, history, and psychology. 

CORE 180H
Health Care and Its Disparities

Dr. Hengameh Hosseini

This interdisciplinary CORE course is designed to provide an overview of the health care system in the United States and its disparities; it will provide the students with a clear understanding of the health care system in the United States, exploring a historical analysis of its structure, operation and financing. While students will be introduced to the accomplishments of the health care system in the United States, they will also learn that it has been less than equitable.

Understanding the American health care system and its disparities involves a critical analysis of historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental conditions that have produced the system and its inequities for racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Students will learn of morbidity and mortality differences for racial and ethnic minorities, and that these are tied to socioeconomic status; that people who are poorer and have less education (who are more likely to be among racial/ethnic minorities) are more likely to suffer from disease, to experience loss of functioning, to be cognitively and physically impaired and to experience higher mortality rates. The students will examine the astronomical rise of health care costs in the United States in recent years which makes these disparities even more acute. 

CORE 180I
Immigration

Dr. David Sosar

At the center of the American cultural experience lies the story of immigration. This course investigates an introduction to the social sciences through the theme of U.S. immigration. The course focuses on a basic understanding of research methods, concepts and models used by social scientists in their respective fields, but through the framework of immigrants to American both past and present. Along with developing an appreciation of the social sciences, students will gain an insight into the groups that have helped to shape the culture of American today. This course will also encourage students to examine the ages, stages, and processes by which women and men born elsewhere emigrated to the United States for political, economic, social, and cultural reasons. 

CORE 181
American Civilization to 1914

Mr. Ronald Mortimer / Mr. Howard Fedrick
Mr. Frank Dutton / Ms. Jennifer Fry

The study of American civilization is "celebration as well as it is critique." It examines achievements and failures; triumphs and tragedies; hopes and frustrations. The study utilizes static data to evaluate and to analyze the dynamic forces and ideas by which men and women have shaped the American story of their times. This discipline asks that students focus on the past that they might see the present more clearly as well as better respond to the forces and ideas of our times. Students should develop their ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects appropriate traditions. American Civilization focuses on the development of the United States from its earliest times to its emergence as a significant world power at the beginning of the 20th century. This course requires the student to acknowledge the complexity and variety of the unique American democratic experience and to recognize the painful price paid by so many in the past for the achievements enjoyed in the present. The major political, economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces of the period 1600-1914 will be examined in this course. 

CORE 184C
The American Individual in Literature

Dr. Robin Field

This course examines one of the dominant American archetypes: the individual. Starting with the colonial period and ending in the present day, we will analyze a range of canonical American literary texts, as well as historical and theoretic secondary sources, to gain insights into the development of this fundamental American character and symbol. The class considers how this archetype furthered national identify and national character, and whether it is culturally useful today. Key issues to be discussed include gender, race, class, economic status, sexuality, place of origin, and educational opportunities. 

CORE 187I
American Social Issues

Mr. Louis Palmeri / Ms. Mary Dysleski

This course helps students answer the question, "What does it mean to be an American?" by exploring the major social issues of the past decade. Students will explore the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of various issues, gaining a broad understanding of how each issue shapes, and is shaped by, our collective identity as U.S. citizens. By challenging students to develop and examine their own informed opinions about current social issues, they will become more responsible and informed participants in American civic life. Issues that may be covered include the changing demographics of the United States; inequalities of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class; health care; the environment; families and social policy; drug policy; immigration past and present. 

CORE 188
American Government

Atty. Joseph Rish

This course will focus on fundamental political principles and concepts as applied to the American political system. Students will examine the formal structure of American government, its basic political institutions, and the political problems created by American society and culture. Political behavior and socialization will be emphasized, particularly as these phenomena contribute to an understanding of the policy-making process in the United States. The diversity of influences within the United States's political system will require study of the significant economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces responsible for defining the substance and the structure of American government. 

Spring 2009

CORE 180H
Health Care and Its Disparities

Dr. Hengameh Hosseini

This interdisciplinary CORE course is designed to provide an overview of the health care system in the United States and its disparities; it will provide the students with a clear understanding of the health care system in the United States, exploring a historical analysis of its structure, operation and financing. While students will be introduced to the accomplishments of the health care system in the United States, they will also learn that it has been less than equitable.

Understanding the American health care system and its disparities involves a critical analysis of historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental conditions that have produced the system and its inequities for racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Students will learn of morbidity and mortality differences for racial and ethnic minorities, and that these are tied to socioeconomic status; that people who are poorer and have less education (who are more likely to be among racial/ethnic minorities) are more likely to suffer from disease, to experience loss of functioning, to be cognitively and physically impaired and to experience higher mortality rates. The students will examine the astronomical rise of health care costs in the United States in recent years which makes these disparities even more acute. 

CORE 180I
Immigration

Dr. David Sosar

At the center of the American cultural experience lies the story of immigration. This course investigates an introduction to the social sciences through the theme of U.S. immigration. The course focuses on a basic understanding of research methods, concepts and models used by social scientists in their respective fields, but through the framework of immigrants to American both past and present. Along with developing an appreciation of the social sciences, students will gain an insight into the groups that have helped to shape the culture of American today. This course will also encourage students to examine the ages, stages, and processes by which women and men born elsewhere emigrated to the United States for political, economic, social, and cultural reasons. 

CORE 181
American Civilization to 1914


Mr. Howard Fedrick / Ms. Jennifer Fry

The study of American civilization is "celebration as well as it is critique." It examines achievements and failures; triumphs and tragedies; hopes and frustrations. The study utilizes static data to evaluate and to analyze the dynamic forces and ideas by which men and women have shaped the American story of their times. This discipline asks that students focus on the past that they might see the present more clearly as well as better respond to the forces and ideas of our times. Students should develop their ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects appropriate traditions. American Civilization focuses on the development of the United States from its earliest times to its emergence as a significant world power at the beginning of the 20th century. This course requires the student to acknowledge the complexity and variety of the unique American democratic experience and to recognize the painful price paid by so many in the past for the achievements enjoyed in the present. The major political, economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces of the period 1600-1914 will be examined in this course. 

CORE 182
American Geography

Dr. Paul Zbiek

This course will present a broad overview of the physical, human, and environmental geography of the United States. This course presents an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the spatial variations of the United States and how they impact the nature and development of the nation. Topics will include American landforms and climate, regionalism; race, ethnicity, and culture; economic and political geography; and environmental issues and initiatives. Students will also gain knowledge and experience in the techniques and technology used in the study of the earth, its physical geography, its climate and its inhabitants. Coursework will provide students practical knowledge in their relationships with the diverse landscapes and cultures of the United States. As a CORE course, this course is further designed to enhance and broaden student learning in correlation with numerous academic disciplines. 

CORE 184C
The American Individual in Literature

Dr. Robin Field

This course examines one of the dominant American archetypes: the individual. Starting with the colonial period and ending in the present day, we will analyze a range of canonical American literary texts, as well as historical and theoretic secondary sources, to gain insights into the development of this fundamental American character and symbol. The class considers how this archetype furthered national identify and national character, and whether it is culturally useful today. Key issues to be discussed include gender, race, class, economic status, sexuality, place of origin, and educational opportunities. 

CORE 186
Religion in America

Dr. Anna Minore

This course explores the question "What does it mean to be an American?" within the context of America’s religious beliefs, religious organizations, and religious practices. Thus the course content is inseparable from questions of class, gender, ethnicity, era, place of origin, and socialization.

The first half of this course focuses on major religious movements. It thus presents a religious topography of our nation. It begins with the colonial period (1492-1789), inclusive of Native peoples, missionary activity, interaction between England and the colonies, and the Great Awakening. It continues with the early nation (1789 – 1865) and Protestant denominationalism and moves into the pre-modern (1865-1918) and modern (1915 and following) years with its wars, immigration, and population diversity. This can be mirrored, for example, in the re-ordering of Protestant and Jewish communities, the presence of non-Christian (e.g. Islamic) communities of faith, and a rising sense of both religious disaffection and religious fundamentalism. This first half of the course therefore provides the student with a survey of religion in America, with an eye to its socio-political and cultural contexts. The second half of the course focuses less on distinct denominations and more on the political and social issues that result from their formation: issues of creation vs. evolution, church-state divisions, the rights given to and withheld from minorities and women, and apocalyptic views of history. These issues influence not only individuals but also the political course and social fabric of the nation. 

CORE 187
American Social Issues

Mr. Louis Palmeri

This course helps students answer the question, "What does it mean to be an American?" by exploring the major social issues of the past decade. Students will explore the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of various issues, gaining a broad understanding of how each issue shapes, and is shaped by, our collective identity as U.S. citizens. By challenging students to develop and examine their own informed opinions about current social issues, they will become more responsible and informed participants in American civic life. Issues that may be covered include the changing demographics of the United States; inequalities of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class; health care; the environment; families and social policy; drug policy; immigration past and present. 

CORE 188
American Government

Dr. Joseph Rish / Dr. David Sosar

This course will focus on fundamental political principles and concepts as applied to the American political system. Students will examine the formal structure of American government, its basic political institutions, and the political problems created by American society and culture. Political behavior and socialization will be emphasized, particularly as these phenomena contribute to an understanding of the policy-making process in the United States. The diversity of influences within the United States's political system will require study of the significant economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces responsible for defining the substance and the structure of American government. 

Fall 2009

CORE 180A
The American Dream

Ms. Valerie Kepner

An introduction to the goals, methods, theories, and research findings associated with the various fields comprising the social sciences as they apply to the study of the American Dream. Students will analyze American behaviors and American institutions in order to understand the American Dream's influence on human behavior, the ways in which societies are organized in order to perpetuate or stifle the American Dream, and the interrelationships of various societal institutions as far as such interrelationships further (or not) the American Dream. Knowledge of the substance, motivation, and consequences of both individual and collective human behavior is essential to the liberally educated person. No educated person can hope to comprehend the complexity of contemporary society without some understanding of how that society is organized and how its various components relate to one another. Economic, political, psychological, historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives provide insights into human behavior and relationships in a complex world. This course will focus on the American Dream while incorporating the social science disciplines of economics, political science, anthropology, sociology, history, and psychology. 

CORE 180H
Health Care and Its Disparities

Dr. Hengameh Hosseini

This interdisciplinary CORE course is designed to provide an overview of the health care system in the United States and its disparities; it will provide the students with a clear understanding of the health care system in the United States, exploring a historical analysis of its structure, operation and financing. While students will be introduced to the accomplishments of the health care system in the United States, they will also learn that it has been less than equitable.

Understanding the American health care system and its disparities involves a critical analysis of historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental conditions that have produced the system and its inequities for racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Students will learn of morbidity and mortality differences for racial and ethnic minorities, and that these are tied to socioeconomic status; that people who are poorer and have less education (who are more likely to be among racial/ethnic minorities) are more likely to suffer from disease, to experience loss of functioning, to be cognitively and physically impaired and to experience higher mortality rates. The students will examine the astronomical rise of health care costs in the United States in recent years which makes these disparities even more acute. 

CORE 180I
Immigration

Dr. David Sosar

At the center of the American cultural experience lies the story of immigration. This course investigates an introduction to the social sciences through the theme of U.S. immigration. The course focuses on a basic understanding of research methods, concepts and models used by social scientists in their respective fields, but through the framework of immigrants to American both past and present. Along with developing an appreciation of the social sciences, students will gain an insight into the groups that have helped to shape the culture of American today. This course will also encourage students to examine the ages, stages, and processes by which women and men born elsewhere emigrated to the United States for political, economic, social, and cultural reasons. 

CORE 181
American Civilization to 1914


Dr. Daniel Curran / TBA
/ Ms. Jennifer Fry

The study of American civilization is "celebration as well as it is critique." It examines achievements and failures; triumphs and tragedies; hopes and frustrations. The study utilizes static data to evaluate and to analyze the dynamic forces and ideas by which men and women have shaped the American story of their times. This discipline asks that students focus on the past that they might see the present more clearly as well as better respond to the forces and ideas of our times. Students should develop their ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects appropriate traditions. American Civilization focuses on the development of the United States from its earliest times to its emergence as a significant world power at the beginning of the 20th century. This course requires the student to acknowledge the complexity and variety of the unique American democratic experience and to recognize the painful price paid by so many in the past for the achievements enjoyed in the present. The major political, economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces of the period 1600-1914 will be examined in this course. 

CORE 184C
The American Individual in Literature

Dr. Robin Field

This course examines one of the dominant American archetypes: the individual. Starting with the colonial period and ending in the present day, we will analyze a range of canonical American literary texts, as well as historical and theoretic secondary sources, to gain insights into the development of this fundamental American character and symbol. The class considers how this archetype furthered national identify and national character, and whether it is culturally useful today. Key issues to be discussed include gender, race, class, economic status, sexuality, place of origin, and educational opportunities. 

CORE 187I
American Social Issues

Ms. Mary Dysleski / Mr. Louis Palmeri

This course helps students answer the question, "What does it mean to be an American?" by exploring the major social issues of the past decade. Students will explore the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of various issues, gaining a broad understanding of how each issue shapes, and is shaped by, our collective identity as U.S. citizens. By challenging students to develop and examine their own informed opinions about current social issues, they will become more responsible and informed participants in American civic life. Issues that may be covered include the changing demographics of the United States; inequalities of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class; health care; the environment; families and social policy; drug policy; immigration past and present. 

CORE 187G
Aging and American Society

Mr. Thomas Visgilio

One of the most significant demographic trends in American society is the aging of its population. As a result, unprecedented changes are anticipated during the next several decades. These changes--expected to transform society in dramatic fashion--will be most evident in housing, health and mental health care, transportation, financial planning, family and personal life, resources allocation, manpower deployment, urban and regional planning, customer relations, product design, marketing and retailing. Students in this course will focus on these changes. They will examine the reasons why they are taking place, analyze the demographic projections that indicate their direction and assess the impact these changes may have on American social values, attitudes, and mores. 

CORE 188
American Government

Dr. Joseph Rish / Dr. David Sosar

This course will focus on fundamental political principles and concepts as applied to the American political system. Students will examine the formal structure of American government, its basic political institutions, and the political problems created by American society and culture. Political behavior and socialization will be emphasized, particularly as these phenomena contribute to an understanding of the policy-making process in the United States. The diversity of influences within the United States's political system will require study of the significant economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces responsible for defining the substance and the structure of American government. 

Spring 2010

CORE 180H
Health Care and Its Disparities

Dr. Hengameh Hosseini

This interdisciplinary CORE course is designed to provide an overview of the health care system in the United States and its disparities; it will provide the students with a clear understanding of the health care system in the United States, exploring a historical analysis of its structure, operation and financing. While students will be introduced to the accomplishments of the health care system in the United States, they will also learn that it has been less than equitable.

Understanding the American health care system and its disparities involves a critical analysis of historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental conditions that have produced the system and its inequities for racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Students will learn of morbidity and mortality differences for racial and ethnic minorities, and that these are tied to socioeconomic status; that people who are poorer and have less education (who are more likely to be among racial/ethnic minorities) are more likely to suffer from disease, to experience loss of functioning, to be cognitively and physically impaired and to experience higher mortality rates. The students will examine the astronomical rise of health care costs in the United States in recent years which makes these disparities even more acute. 

CORE 180I
Immigration

Dr. David Sosar

At the center of the American cultural experience lies the story of immigration. This course investigates an introduction to the social sciences through the theme of U.S. immigration. The course focuses on a basic understanding of research methods, concepts and models used by social scientists in their respective fields, but through the framework of immigrants to American both past and present. Along with developing an appreciation of the social sciences, students will gain an insight into the groups that have helped to shape the culture of American today. This course will also encourage students to examine the ages, stages, and processes by which women and men born elsewhere emigrated to the United States for political, economic, social, and cultural reasons. 

CORE 181
American Civilization to 1914


Mr. Howard Fedrick
/ Ms. Jennifer Fry

The study of American civilization is "celebration as well as it is critique." It examines achievements and failures; triumphs and tragedies; hopes and frustrations. The study utilizes static data to evaluate and to analyze the dynamic forces and ideas by which men and women have shaped the American story of their times. This discipline asks that students focus on the past that they might see the present more clearly as well as better respond to the forces and ideas of our times. Students should develop their ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects appropriate traditions. American Civilization focuses on the development of the United States from its earliest times to its emergence as a significant world power at the beginning of the 20th century. This course requires the student to acknowledge the complexity and variety of the unique American democratic experience and to recognize the painful price paid by so many in the past for the achievements enjoyed in the present. The major political, economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces of the period 1600-1914 will be examined in this course. 

CORE 184C
The American Individual in Literature

Dr. Robin Field

This course examines one of the dominant American archetypes: the individual. Starting with the colonial period and ending in the present day, we will analyze a range of canonical American literary texts, as well as historical and theoretic secondary sources, to gain insights into the development of this fundamental American character and symbol. The class considers how this archetype furthered national identify and national character, and whether it is culturally useful today. Key issues to be discussed include gender, race, class, economic status, sexuality, place of origin, and educational opportunities. 

CORE 187I
American Social Concerns

Ms. Mary Dysleski

This course helps students answer the question, "What does it mean to be an American?" by exploring the major social issues of the past decade. Students will explore the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of various issues, gaining a broad understanding of how each issue shapes, and is shaped by, our collective identity as U.S. citizens. By challenging students to develop and examine their own informed opinions about current social issues, they will become more responsible and informed participants in American civic life. Issues that may be covered include the changing demographics of the United States; inequalities of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class; health care; the environment; families and social policy; drug policy; immigration past and present. 

CORE 188
American Government

Dr. Joseph Rish / Dr. David Sosar

This course will focus on fundamental political principles and concepts as applied to the American political system. Students will examine the formal structure of American government, its basic political institutions, and the political problems created by American society and culture. Political behavior and socialization will be emphasized, particularly as these phenomena contribute to an understanding of the policy-making process in the United States. The diversity of influences within the United States's political system will require study of the significant economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces responsible for defining the substance and the structure of American government. 

Fall 2010

CORE 180A
The American Dream

Ms. Valerie Kepner

An introduction to the goals, methods, theories, and research findings associated with the various fields comprising the social sciences as they apply to the study of the American Dream. Students will analyze American behaviors and American institutions in order to understand the American Dream's influence on human behavior, the ways in which societies are organized in order to perpetuate or stifle the American Dream, and the interrelationships of various societal institutions as far as such interrelationships further (or not) the American Dream. Knowledge of the substance, motivation, and consequences of both individual and collective human behavior is essential to the liberally educated person. No educated person can hope to comprehend the complexity of contemporary society without some understanding of how that society is organized and how its various components relate to one another. Economic, political, psychological, historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives provide insights into human behavior and relationships in a complex world. This course will focus on the American Dream while incorporating the social science disciplines of economics, political science, anthropology, sociology, history, and psychology. 

CORE 180H
Health Care and Its Disparities

Dr. Hengameh Hosseini

This interdisciplinary CORE course is designed to provide an overview of the health care system in the United States and its disparities; it will provide the students with a clear understanding of the health care system in the United States, exploring a historical analysis of its structure, operation and financing. While students will be introduced to the accomplishments of the health care system in the United States, they will also learn that it has been less than equitable.

Understanding the American health care system and its disparities involves a critical analysis of historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental conditions that have produced the system and its inequities for racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Students will learn of morbidity and mortality differences for racial and ethnic minorities, and that these are tied to socioeconomic status; that people who are poorer and have less education (who are more likely to be among racial/ethnic minorities) are more likely to suffer from disease, to experience loss of functioning, to be cognitively and physically impaired and to experience higher mortality rates. The students will examine the astronomical rise of health care costs in the United States in recent years which makes these disparities even more acute. 

CORE 180I
Immigration

Dr. David Sosar

At the center of the American cultural experience lies the story of immigration. This course investigates an introduction to the social sciences through the theme of U.S. immigration. The course focuses on a basic understanding of research methods, concepts and models used by social scientists in their respective fields, but through the framework of immigrants to American both past and present. Along with developing an appreciation of the social sciences, students will gain an insight into the groups that have helped to shape the culture of American today. This course will also encourage students to examine the ages, stages, and processes by which women and men born elsewhere emigrated to the United States for political, economic, social, and cultural reasons. 

CORE 181
American Civilization to 1914


Mrs. Sandra Case
/ Dr. Jennifer Fry

The study of American civilization is "celebration as well as it is critique." It examines achievements and failures; triumphs and tragedies; hopes and frustrations. The study utilizes static data to evaluate and to analyze the dynamic forces and ideas by which men and women have shaped the American story of their times. This discipline asks that students focus on the past that they might see the present more clearly as well as better respond to the forces and ideas of our times. Students should develop their ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects appropriate traditions. American Civilization focuses on the development of the United States from its earliest times to its emergence as a significant world power at the beginning of the 20th century. This course requires the student to acknowledge the complexity and variety of the unique American democratic experience and to recognize the painful price paid by so many in the past for the achievements enjoyed in the present. The major political, economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces of the period 1600-1914 will be examined in this course. 

CORE 187I
American Social Concerns

Ms. Mary Dysleski /
Mr. Lou Palmieri

This course helps students answer the question, "What does it mean to be an American?" by exploring the major social issues of the past decade. Students will explore the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of various issues, gaining a broad understanding of how each issue shapes, and is shaped by, our collective identity as U.S. citizens. By challenging students to develop and examine their own informed opinions about current social issues, they will become more responsible and informed participants in American civic life. Issues that may be covered include the changing demographics of the United States; inequalities of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class; health care; the environment; families and social policy; drug policy; immigration past and present. 

CORE 188
American Government

Dr. Joseph Rish

This course will focus on fundamental political principles and concepts as applied to the American political system. Students will examine the formal structure of American government, its basic political institutions, and the political problems created by American society and culture. Political behavior and socialization will be emphasized, particularly as these phenomena contribute to an understanding of the policy-making process in the United States. The diversity of influences within the United States's political system will require study of the significant economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces responsible for defining the substance and the structure of American government. 

Spring 2011

CORE 180A
The American Dream

Ms. Valerie Kepner

An introduction to the goals, methods, theories, and research findings associated with the various fields comprising the social sciences as they apply to the study of the American Dream. Students will analyze American behaviors and American institutions in order to understand the American Dream's influence on human behavior, the ways in which societies are organized in order to perpetuate or stifle the American Dream, and the interrelationships of various societal institutions as far as such interrelationships further (or not) the American Dream. Knowledge of the substance, motivation, and consequences of both individual and collective human behavior is essential to the liberally educated person. No educated person can hope to comprehend the complexity of contemporary society without some understanding of how that society is organized and how its various components relate to one another. Economic, political, psychological, historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives provide insights into human behavior and relationships in a complex world. This course will focus on the American Dream while incorporating the social science disciplines of economics, political science, anthropology, sociology, history, and psychology. 

CORE 180H
Health Care and Its Disparities

Dr. Hengameh Hosseini
(TTh 11:00)

This interdisciplinary CORE course is designed to provide an overview of the health care system in the United States and its disparities; it will provide the students with a clear understanding of the health care system in the United States, exploring a historical analysis of its structure, operation and financing. While students will be introduced to the accomplishments of the health care system in the United States, they will also learn that it has been less than equitable.

Understanding the American health care system and its disparities involves a critical analysis of historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental conditions that have produced the system and its inequities for racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Students will learn of morbidity and mortality differences for racial and ethnic minorities, and that these are tied to socioeconomic status; that people who are poorer and have less education (who are more likely to be among racial/ethnic minorities) are more likely to suffer from disease, to experience loss of functioning, to be cognitively and physically impaired and to experience higher mortality rates. The students will examine the astronomical rise of health care costs in the United States in recent years which makes these disparities even more acute. 

CORE 180I
Immigration

Dr. David Sosar
(TTh 12:30; 2:00)

At the center of the American cultural experience lies the story of immigration. This course investigates an introduction to the social sciences through the theme of U.S. immigration. The course focuses on a basic understanding of research methods, concepts and models used by social scientists in their respective fields, but through the framework of immigrants to American both past and present. Along with developing an appreciation of the social sciences, students will gain an insight into the groups that have helped to shape the culture of American today. This course will also encourage students to examine the ages, stages, and processes by which women and men born elsewhere emigrated to the United States for political, economic, social, and cultural reasons. 

CORE 181
American Civilization to 1914


Dr. Jennifer Fry
(MWF 9:00; 10:00; 11:00)
Mrs. Sandra Kase
(TTh 9:30; 11:00)

The study of American civilization is "celebration as well as it is critique." It examines achievements and failures; triumphs and tragedies; hopes and frustrations. The study utilizes static data to evaluate and to analyze the dynamic forces and ideas by which men and women have shaped the American story of their times. This discipline asks that students focus on the past that they might see the present more clearly as well as better respond to the forces and ideas of our times. Students should develop their ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects appropriate traditions. American Civilization focuses on the development of the United States from its earliest times to its emergence as a significant world power at the beginning of the 20th century. This course requires the student to acknowledge the complexity and variety of the unique American democratic experience and to recognize the painful price paid by so many in the past for the achievements enjoyed in the present. The major political, economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces of the period 1600-1914 will be examined in this course. 

CORE 187I
American Social Concerns

Ms. Mary Dysleski (TTh 12:30)
Mr. Lou Palmieri (MWF 8:00)

This course helps students answer the question, "What does it mean to be an American?" by exploring the major social issues of the past decade. Students will explore the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of various issues, gaining a broad understanding of how each issue shapes, and is shaped by, our collective identity as U.S. citizens. By challenging students to develop and examine their own informed opinions about current social issues, they will become more responsible and informed participants in American civic life. Issues that may be covered include the changing demographics of the United States; inequalities of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class; health care; the environment; families and social policy; drug policy; immigration past and present. 

CORE 188
American Government

Dr. Joseph Rish (MWF 9:00)

This course will focus on fundamental political principles and concepts as applied to the American political system. Students will examine the formal structure of American government, its basic political institutions, and the political problems created by American society and culture. Political behavior and socialization will be emphasized, particularly as these phenomena contribute to an understanding of the policy-making process in the United States. The diversity of influences within the United States's political system will require study of the significant economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces responsible for defining the substance and the structure of American government. 

FAll 2011

CORE 180A
The American Dream

Ms. Valerie Kepner
(MW 2:00)

An introduction to the goals, methods, theories, and research findings associated with the various fields comprising the social sciences as they apply to the study of the American Dream. Students will analyze American behaviors and American institutions in order to understand the American Dream's influence on human behavior, the ways in which societies are organized in order to perpetuate or stifle the American Dream, and the interrelationships of various societal institutions as far as such interrelationships further (or not) the American Dream. Knowledge of the substance, motivation, and consequences of both individual and collective human behavior is essential to the liberally educated person. No educated person can hope to comprehend the complexity of contemporary society without some understanding of how that society is organized and how its various components relate to one another. Economic, political, psychological, historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives provide insights into human behavior and relationships in a complex world. This course will focus on the American Dream while incorporating the social science disciplines of economics, political science, anthropology, sociology, history, and psychology. 

CORE 180H
Health Care and Its Disparities

Dr. Hengameh Hosseini
(TTh 11:00)

This interdisciplinary CORE course is designed to provide an overview of the health care system in the United States and its disparities; it will provide the students with a clear understanding of the health care system in the United States, exploring a historical analysis of its structure, operation and financing. While students will be introduced to the accomplishments of the health care system in the United States, they will also learn that it has been less than equitable.

Understanding the American health care system and its disparities involves a critical analysis of historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental conditions that have produced the system and its inequities for racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Students will learn of morbidity and mortality differences for racial and ethnic minorities, and that these are tied to socioeconomic status; that people who are poorer and have less education (who are more likely to be among racial/ethnic minorities) are more likely to suffer from disease, to experience loss of functioning, to be cognitively and physically impaired and to experience higher mortality rates. The students will examine the astronomical rise of health care costs in the United States in recent years which makes these disparities even more acute. 

CORE 180I
Immigration

Dr. David Sosar
(TTh 12:30; 2:00)

At the center of the American cultural experience lies the story of immigration. This course investigates an introduction to the social sciences through the theme of U.S. immigration. The course focuses on a basic understanding of research methods, concepts and models used by social scientists in their respective fields, but through the framework of immigrants to American both past and present. Along with developing an appreciation of the social sciences, students will gain an insight into the groups that have helped to shape the culture of American today. This course will also encourage students to examine the ages, stages, and processes by which women and men born elsewhere emigrated to the United States for political, economic, social, and cultural reasons. 

CORE 181
American Civilization to 1914


Staff
(MWF 8:00; 10:00; 12:00)
Ms. Kimberly Fabbri
(TTh 8:00; 9:30)

The study of American civilization is "celebration as well as it is critique." It examines achievements and failures; triumphs and tragedies; hopes and frustrations. The study utilizes static data to evaluate and to analyze the dynamic forces and ideas by which men and women have shaped the American story of their times. This discipline asks that students focus on the past that they might see the present more clearly as well as better respond to the forces and ideas of our times. Students should develop their ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects appropriate traditions. American Civilization focuses on the development of the United States from its earliest times to its emergence as a significant world power at the beginning of the 20th century. This course requires the student to acknowledge the complexity and variety of the unique American democratic experience and to recognize the painful price paid by so many in the past for the achievements enjoyed in the present. The major political, economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces of the period 1600-1914 will be examined in this course. 

CORE 184
American Texts & Contexts:
Rebels and Renegades

Dr. Robin Field (MWF 9:00)

This course examines one of the dominant American archetypes: the individual. Starting with the colonial period and ending in the present day, we will analyze a range of canonical American literary texts, as well as historical and theoretic secondary sources, to gain insights into the development of this fundamental American character and symbol. The class considers how this archetype furthered national identify and national character, and whether it is culturally useful today. Key issues to be discussed include gender, race, class, economic status, sexuality, place of origin, and educational opportunities. 

CORE 187
American Social Concerns

Mr. Louis Palmeri (MWF 8:00)
Ms. Mary Dysleski (TTh 12:30)

This course helps students answer the question, "What does it mean to be an American?" by exploring the major social issues of the past decade. Students will explore the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of various issues, gaining a broad understanding of how each issue shapes, and is shaped by, our collective identity as U.S. citizens. By challenging students to develop and examine their own informed opinions about current social issues, they will become more responsible and informed participants in American civic life. Issues that may be covered include the changing demographics of the United States; inequalities of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class; health care; the environment; families and social policy; drug policy; immigration past and present. 

CORE 188
American Government

Dr. Joseph Rish (MWF 9:00)
Dr. David Sosar (MWF 11:00)

This course will focus on fundamental political principles and concepts as applied to the American political system. Students will examine the formal structure of American government, its basic political institutions, and the political problems created by American society and culture. Political behavior and socialization will be emphasized, particularly as these phenomena contribute to an understanding of the policy-making process in the United States. The diversity of influences within the United States's political system will require study of the significant economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces responsible for defining the substance and the structure of American government. 

SPRING 2012

CORE 180H
Health Care and Its Disparities

Dr. Hengameh Hosseini
(TTh 11:00)

This interdisciplinary CORE course is designed to provide an overview of the health care system in the United States and its disparities; it will provide the students with a clear understanding of the health care system in the United States, exploring a historical analysis of its structure, operation and financing. While students will be introduced to the accomplishments of the health care system in the United States, they will also learn that it has been less than equitable.

Understanding the American health care system and its disparities involves a critical analysis of historical, political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental conditions that have produced the system and its inequities for racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Students will learn of morbidity and mortality differences for racial and ethnic minorities, and that these are tied to socioeconomic status; that people who are poorer and have less education (who are more likely to be among racial/ethnic minorities) are more likely to suffer from disease, to experience loss of functioning, to be cognitively and physically impaired and to experience higher mortality rates. The students will examine the astronomical rise of health care costs in the United States in recent years which makes these disparities even more acute. 

CORE 180I
Immigration

Dr. David Sosar
(TTh 9:30; 12:30)

At the center of the American cultural experience lies the story of immigration. This course investigates an introduction to the social sciences through the theme of U.S. immigration. The course focuses on a basic understanding of research methods, concepts and models used by social scientists in their respective fields, but through the framework of immigrants to American both past and present. Along with developing an appreciation of the social sciences, students will gain an insight into the groups that have helped to shape the culture of American today. This course will also encourage students to examine the ages, stages, and processes by which women and men born elsewhere emigrated to the United States for political, economic, social, and cultural reasons. 

CORE 181
American Civilization to 1914


Dr. Thomas Mackaman
(MWF 8:00; 10:00; 12:00)

The study of American civilization is "celebration as well as it is critique." It examines achievements and failures; triumphs and tragedies; hopes and frustrations. The study utilizes static data to evaluate and to analyze the dynamic forces and ideas by which men and women have shaped the American story of their times. This discipline asks that students focus on the past that they might see the present more clearly as well as better respond to the forces and ideas of our times. Students should develop their ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects appropriate traditions. American Civilization focuses on the development of the United States from its earliest times to its emergence as a significant world power at the beginning of the 20th century. This course requires the student to acknowledge the complexity and variety of the unique American democratic experience and to recognize the painful price paid by so many in the past for the achievements enjoyed in the present. The major political, economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces of the period 1600-1914 will be examined in this course. 

CORE 182
American Geography

Dr. Paul Zbiek (TTh 9:30; 2:00)

This course will present a broad overview of the physical, human, and environmental geography of the United States. This course presents an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the spatial variations of the United States and how they impact the nature and development of the nation. Topics will include American landforms and climate, regionalism; race, ethnicity, and culture; economic and political geography; and environmental issues and initiatives. Students will also gain knowledge and experience in the techniques and technology used in the study of the earth, its physical geography, its climate and its inhabitants. Coursework will provide students practical knowledge in their relationships with the diverse landscapes and cultures of the United States. As a CORE course, this course is further designed to enhance and broaden student learning in correlation with numerous academic disciplines.  

CORE 187
American Social Concerns

Mr. Louis Palmeri (MWF 8:00)

This course helps students answer the question, "What does it mean to be an American?" by exploring the major social issues of the past decade. Students will explore the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of various issues, gaining a broad understanding of how each issue shapes, and is shaped by, our collective identity as U.S. citizens. By challenging students to develop and examine their own informed opinions about current social issues, they will become more responsible and informed participants in American civic life. Issues that may be covered include the changing demographics of the United States; inequalities of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class; health care; the environment; families and social policy; drug policy; immigration past and present. 

CORE 188
American Government

Dr. Joseph Rish (MWF 9:00)
Dr. Ayesha Ray (MWF 12:00)

This course will focus on fundamental political principles and concepts as applied to the American political system. Students will examine the formal structure of American government, its basic political institutions, and the political problems created by American society and culture. Political behavior and socialization will be emphasized, particularly as these phenomena contribute to an understanding of the policy-making process in the United States. The diversity of influences within the United States's political system will require study of the significant economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces responsible for defining the substance and the structure of American government. 

FALL 2012

CORE 180A
The American Dream

Dr. Valerie Kepner
(MW 2:00; TTh 11:00)

An introduction to the goals, methods, theories, and research findings associated with the various fields comprising the social sciences as they apply to the study of the American Dream. Students will analyze American behaviors and American institutions in order to understand the American Dream's influence on human behavior, the ways in which societies are organized in order to perpetuate or stifle the American Dream, and the interrelationships of various societal institutions as far as such interrelationships further (or not) the American Dream. Knowledge of the substance, motivation, and consequences of both individual and collective human behavior is essential to the liberally educated person. No educated person can hope to comprehend the complexity of contemporary society without some understanding of how that society is organized and how its various components relate to one another. Economic, political, psychological, historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives provide insights into human behavior and relationships in a complex world. This course will focus on the American Dream while incorporating the social science disciplines of economics, political science, anthropology, sociology, history, and psychology. 

CORE 180I
Immigration

Dr. David Sosar
(TTh 9:30; 12:30; 2:00)

At the center of the American cultural experience lies the story of immigration. This course investigates an introduction to the social sciences through the theme of U.S. immigration. The course focuses on a basic understanding of research methods, concepts and models used by social scientists in their respective fields, but through the framework of immigrants to American both past and present. Along with developing an appreciation of the social sciences, students will gain an insight into the groups that have helped to shape the culture of American today. This course will also encourage students to examine the ages, stages, and processes by which women and men born elsewhere emigrated to the United States for political, economic, social, and cultural reasons. 

CORE 181
American Civilization to 1914


Dr. Thomas Mackaman
(MWF 8:00; 10:00; 11:00; 1:00)

The study of American civilization is "celebration as well as it is critique." It examines achievements and failures; triumphs and tragedies; hopes and frustrations. The study utilizes static data to evaluate and to analyze the dynamic forces and ideas by which men and women have shaped the American story of their times. This discipline asks that students focus on the past that they might see the present more clearly as well as better respond to the forces and ideas of our times. Students should develop their ability to judge and decide both private and public issues in a context which respects appropriate traditions. American Civilization focuses on the development of the United States from its earliest times to its emergence as a significant world power at the beginning of the 20th century. This course requires the student to acknowledge the complexity and variety of the unique American democratic experience and to recognize the painful price paid by so many in the past for the achievements enjoyed in the present. The major political, economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces of the period 1600-1914 will be examined in this course. 

CORE 187
American Social Concerns

Mr. Louis Palmeri (MWF 8:00)
Ms. Mary Dysleski (TTh 12:30)

This course helps students answer the question, "What does it mean to be an American?" by exploring the major social issues of the past decade. Students will explore the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of various issues, gaining a broad understanding of how each issue shapes, and is shaped by, our collective identity as U.S. citizens. By challenging students to develop and examine their own informed opinions about current social issues, they will become more responsible and informed participants in American civic life. Issues that may be covered include the changing demographics of the United States; inequalities of race, ethnicity, gender, and social class; health care; the environment; families and social policy; drug policy; immigration past and present. 

CORE 188
American Government

Dr. Joseph Rish (MWF 9:00)
Dr. Ayesha Ray (MWF 12:00)

This course will focus on fundamental political principles and concepts as applied to the American political system. Students will examine the formal structure of American government, its basic political institutions, and the political problems created by American society and culture. Political behavior and socialization will be emphasized, particularly as these phenomena contribute to an understanding of the policy-making process in the United States. The diversity of influences within the United States's political system will require study of the significant economic, social, cultural, and technological events and forces responsible for defining the substance and the structure of American government.